Michael Mendizza

michael_mendizza
As a documentary film maker I have interviewed hundreds of remarkable human beings and I consider everyone a teacher. Some I call mentors because the trust, respect and friendship we develop becomes a constant source of life-changing insight and inspiration. Joseph Chilton Pearce and I have such a relationship. There are others.

Attachment Parenting International and Touch the Future

Attachment Parenting International and Touch the Future both began 20 years ago. Both were inspired by the same vision; kids are not the problem, the self-world view each child develops and therefore society is model and experience dependent and parents are the primary model and the experience.

Post World War Two changes pulled the extended family rug out from under parents. Grandma was absent, boomer moms were chasing Valium with gin and tonic, babies were separated by technological births and never quite got the connection right, TV was the sitter and compulsory schooling began earlier and earlier to name just a few.

Themes: 
bonding
childhood
parenting

Essential Joseph Chilton Pearce 51

Childhood Depression and Despair
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Childhood suicide in America begins at age three. Suicide is the third cause of death of American children between the age of five and seventeen. If all the attempts at suicide were successful it would be, by a wide margin, the largest cause of death. All this indicates a pervasive lack of hope in children, brought about by the failure of basic nurturing (mother-infant separation and day-care), followed by reciprocal audio-visual communication which television-computers supplanted, and a corresponding loss of play. Add up the score and you get despair.

Making a Difference


A philanthropist asked: "With so many worthy nonprofit organizations and such need, what would you do? Where would you invest ten thousand or ten million dollars, and why?"

The answer, I maintain, depends on depth; treating symptoms or root causes. A person bleeding after an accident needs immediate attention. Stop the bleeding. Preventing the injury is more complex, more challenging. We need to do both.

Culture is the cause. Self-inflicted suffering and violence is the bleeding. Yes, self-inflected. In a recent interview the Dali Lama observed that we create most of our problems. Physicist David Bohm, protégé of Einstein, put it this way:

We are faced with a breakdown of general social order and human values that threatens stability throughout the world. Existing knowledge cannot meet this challenge. Something much deeper is needed, a completely new approach. I am suggesting that the very means by which we try to solve our problems is the problem. The source of our problems is within the structure of thought itself.

Collectively what Bohm calls thought expresses as Culture. Culture is our semantic-reality, the conditioned memories triggered by words, mental, emotional and physical images and our identification with these images. The culturally induced inner image we believe we are and the outer image we call culture emanate from the same root. Both are images. Both are, at close examination, the same. This insight is both obvious and profound. The difference between our personal image of self and the outer image we call culture is defined only by which end of the telescope we are viewing, near or far, inner or outer. The root of our personal and global conflict emanates from this image.

Themes: 
bonding
childhood
culture
parenting

Bullying and Childhood Cruelty Compels Violent Behavior

Bullying and Childhood Cruelty Compels Violent Behavior

James W. Prescott, Ph.D.

Bullying begins before cognitive language skills are developed-- in the home and Kindergarten.

Vinca Lafleur reviews in The Washington Post:

‘Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy’ by Emily Bazelon.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/sticks-and-stones-defeating-the-culture-of-bullying-and-rediscovering-the-power-of-character-and-empathy-by-emily-bazelon/2013/03/15/66bfe65e-82ab-11e2-a350-49866afab584_print.html

By VINCA LAFLEUR, Published: March 15

In researching her book “Sticks and Stones,” Emily Bazelon was struck by how many of the adults she interviewed “could access, with riveting clarity, a memory of childhood bullying.” Whether they had been victims, bullies or bystanders didn’t seem to matter. “These early experiences of cruelty were transformative,” she writes, “no matter which role you played in the memory reel.”

Bullying isn’t new. But our attempts to respond to it are, as Bazelon explains in her richly detailed, thought-provoking book. Scholarship on bullying has its roots in the 1970s, when Swedish psychologist Dan Olweus developed what became the gold standard for prevention programs in schools. Yet it wasn’t until 1999, when Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris opened fire on their Columbine classmates, that the United States began tackling the issue in a serious way.

Responding to Bullying will not stop Bullying. Only PREVETION can stop Bullying This writer has proposed that the failure of affectional bonding in human relationships and in the maternal-infant/child relationship, in particular, are the real source of violence and bullying:

This writer wrote in

How Culture Shapes the Developing Brain and the Future of Humanity
And what we can do to change it.

Themes: 
childhood
parenting
violence

Two Americas: Two Moralities: Two Cultural Brains

TWO AMERICAS: TWO MORALITIES: TWO HUMANITIES: TWO CULTURAL BRAINS

James W. Prescott, Ph.D.

This writer has previously proposed that Two Americas exist because our Two Humanities with our Two Moralities have been generated by our Two Cultural Brains that have been formed by the two evolutionary life experiences of Pain and Pleasure, which encodes our evolutionary and developing brain for Peace or Violence. This worldview can be seen at the following sites:
http://www.violence.de/prescott/letters/Our_Two_Cultural_Brains.pdf
http://www.violence.de/prescott/letters/Profiles_Peaceful_v_Violent.pdf

SIMONE DE BEAUVOIR (1949/20 in The Second Sex noted the two moralities that divide Man and Woman—our Humanity—that propels Humanity toward Peace or Violence:

The mother would enjoy the same lasting prestige as the father if she assumed equal material and moral responsibility for the couple; the child would feel an androgynous world around her and not a masculine world; were she more affectively attracted to her father—which is not even certain—her love for him would be nuanced by a will to emulate him and not a feeling of weakness: she would not turn to passivity “ (p.761).

Does Beauvoir imply that the daughter is responsible for her Father’s affection? The responsibility for affection resides with the parent not the child. If the parent fails in this most important behavior, who is responsible? Their parents who did not receive the love from their parents as a child or is culture ultimately responsible for the values and behaviors it creates?

Themes: 
brain
childhood
culture
parenting
violence

A Brief Very Incomplete History of Parenting

playful parenting

Male and female roles in pre-agricultural societies were egalitarian. God was nature. Assumed male superiority with its implicit violence against women and children emerged with monotheism, the old-testament, a single male-dominate King laying down the law. Can you believe we still believe this fairy tale?

Down through the ages children were livestock, bred as a buffer for survival. Abuses of all kinds were harsh and systemic. Women nurtured when they could and men disciplined. The extended family was communal. Children more or less belonged to the tribe. Personal identity was not individual rather communal. One was a Cooper, a barrel maker or a Smith, blacksmith. Allegiance and values were set by family, village or community and these were controlled by the iron fists of magician-priests.

Children have always lost their fathers to wars and there have always been wars. With the industrial revolution we disposable males were herded into factories, with a corresponding loss of influence in the lives of our children. A century later, in the mid 20th century, the 50’s and 60’s to be more precise, children lost their mothers to women’s liberation and the work place, by design. Women’s Liberation meant the Rockefellers and other old-money social engineers would ‘profit’ from the missing 50% of the labor pool and children would be forced into government certified conditioning factories with nice doublespeak names like ‘day care,’ earlier and earlier.

Themes: 
bonding
childhood
parenting

Not Broken Don't Bond It

not broken

The point is maintaining relationship – not connecting something that is broken.

The terms bonding and attachment imply separation, to bond, connect, glue together separate parts. Life is relationship. We are never separate, except in our minds.

We are the light, the air, the water, the nutrients, the heat, the vibration, gravity, ever-changing movement and much more. The human body and brain is defined by the environment. Each mirrors the other. But we forget. The deeper reality and challenge is to prevent this ongoing, dynamic and reciprocal connection from being broken.

Joseph Chilton Pearce and I were exploring the root cause of our social and political calamity. Joe lamented that nature’s agenda during pregnancy, birth and the sensitive postnatal period – doesn’t happen. What could be fails to unfold. ‘Houston, we have a problem.’ See: https://ttfuture.org/files/2/members/esa_jcp_biology_culture.pdf

Themes: 
birth
bonding
childhood
play
pleasure
pregnancy

More on Technology in the Classroom - NOT

reading on a desk top

A friend sent a link to a New York Times article about technology in the classroom – NOT.

The chief technology officer of eBay sends his children to a nine-classroom school here. So do employees of Silicon Valley giants like Google, Apple, Yahoo and Hewlett-Packard. But the school’s chief teaching tools are anything but high-tech: pens and paper, knitting needles and, occasionally, mud. Not a computer to be found. No screens at all. They are not allowed in the classroom, and the school even frowns on their use at home.

Themes: 
childhood
creativity
education
learning

The Weaver Becomes the Web

digital brain 2

Appropriate Use of Technology in Education

The overarching insight in neuroscience the past decade is:

‘Brain and environment are one, interdependent, reciprocal dynamic process. Change the environment and you change the brain.'

The human brain created Technology that changed the environment that is now changing the brain. In the mid 1800’s Emerson, cautious of the industrial revolution, noted; the weaver becomes the web.

Themes: 
brain
childhood
creativity
education

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