Distracted by Design

We are living in strange times but nothing that we are experiencing was not warned about long ago.
We are just too busy, distracted by design, to notice the persistent patterns.

Themes: 
media
freedom
democracy
vaccinations

This is only the beginning (corrected)

Corrected link below.

The inner is the outer. Our collective psyche, what we call our social ego, projects itself outside as culture which loops back and shapes our personal psyche. What we call consciousness is a house of mirrors. We think we are in control only to find out that what we think has, to a disturbing degree, been implanted. Then, along comes radio, television, computers and the internet flooding our inner-world like Katerina flooded New Orleans. As Jerry Mander noted way back in 1978, in his Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television, many of the problems with television are inherent in the medium and technology itself, thus cannot be reformed, for the common good that is. They can and are being used and manipulated by the very few and powerful to control the rest, meaning you and me.

Themes: 
media
freedom
censorship
vaccinations

Mass Education and Mass Media Do The Same Thing, But Differently

Speaking with a colleague whose husband had, what we plebeians (commoners) would call, an aristocratic title, noted, “He was bred to believe he was superior.” From his perspective what we might call arrogant is simply how reality is. When one’s republic dumbs-down into an Oligarchy, as former President Jimmy Carter describes has taken place in the United States, all the underlying assumptions regarding democracy, the rules and morality that govern society we are taught in school are off. We are witnessing what Chris Hedges, John Taylor gatto and Noam Chomsky call class warfare, a very old story indeed.

Themes: 
democracy
media
education

How Could This (not) Happen?

Media has a major role to play in the mediation of consciousness, the mediation of reality.
Jerry Mander

Three points of view:

To help bring some perspective to the shock many are feeling I invite you to hold and ponder together three interrelated points of view.

Themes: 
media
freedom
democracy

Quiet or Scattered

Traveling with Carly Elizabeth, 22 months today, has been a rich adventure for her and for me. Neither she nor I speak the language. People all around are talking about all sorts of things but what she and I mostly get is energy, hints of emotional context, but very little content. This creates a very unusual vantage point, at least for me. I get to experience, more or less, what Carly is experiencing, and the best word I can think of is energy. Suddenly all the people and things we encounter are big or little, intense or calm, loud or soft tornados of swirling energy, bumping into the other and changing as they react to these collisions.

Themes: 
attention
ADHD
storytelling
media

Marinated Minds

My wife and I went to a meeting for several hours. When we returned we both remarked that Carly Elizabeth had changed and indeed she had. No surprise here. She is changing every moment. We simply aren’t acute enough to notice. This morning she climbed the wood stairs hefting one of my shoes then scooted down, face first, carefully and skillfully on her way to the leather sofa that she now uses like a baby trampoline, exploring the bounce and uneven surfaces, smiling and uttering a variety of sounds as if to say, “there!” It was only a few weeks ago that she began to walk. Today it is a near constant joyful run. That is how fast her constant changing is.

Themes: 
attention
technology
child development
media
screen time

Radiant Attention

The shared attention between parents and children, between all of us really, I maintain, is telepathic. Recall Rupert Sheldrake’s studies on feeling watched and with animals. The question, of course, is the degree that we are sensitive and attentive to this subtle radiant communication. Sadly, mostly we are not which leaves our young children, who are innately sensitive and aware, stranded and disconnected.

Themes: 
attention
parenting
media
technology

The Number One On-Line Anything for Children Age Two... What?

It breaks my heart to see the propaganda. The Number One On-Line Anything for Children Age Two complete with college cap and diploma. This happy, smiling fake mouse magically appeared signing off from Facebook. How many hits; 892,469 likes and 50,017 talking about? How many young parents have been lured by the Hurried Child, Baby Einstein, early is better, screen time is educational, get junior off to a good, NO the best possible start, to keep up with the neighbors and the dumb-down standards, competing for that coveted position at the XYZ Preschool hoping she will make the cut.

Themes: 
brain
education
media

TV-Computers

Technology and the developing brain
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Many of the great activities in the neo-cortex, as soon as these activities have completed themselves and no longer need to be developed, the lowest systems can take them over and handle them on an autonomic basis, automatic basis. This is precisely what happens with television, very rapidly, no learning is involved whatsoever.

Even all sorts of great activities in the neo-cortex, as soon as these activities have completed themselves and no longer need to be developed, the lowest systems can take them over and handle them on an autonomic basis, automatic basis. So this is precisely what happens with television, very rapidly, no learning is involved whatsoever. Now what this means, if the child doesn’t get any other kind of stimulus, even if that’s the major stimulus coming in, the major part of his time as it is, in order to rack up 5,000 to 6,000 hours in the first five years of life. Then, you fail to activate and bring into play a major part of the neural structure of the neo-cortex and the affective brain as it interacts with that to build new neural structures. So you get there a loss of neural development, simply a failure to development those parts of the brain.

Now the problem is nature’s dicta is use it or lose it and so you will get an actual atrophying, a slow withering away of processes that are not there. I think they can always be reactivated and can be re-stimulated but it would take a lot of work. We don’t need to say anything more about television than that, with the qualification, that if the child doesn’t receive other stimuli.

We don’t have to say anything more about television with the exception that now about 70% of your children are really now in serious trouble, they’re moving toward that, but we have an awful lot of very bright and functional children and the system is still moving right along. What about these children? They also saw television but they also, and any study shows this, they also did not suffer a lot of the other things that these children do and they were played with by their parent, they were told some stories by their parents. And I think one of the great ironies if they are played with, if they do develop play, if they do develop the capacity for internal imaging then the television is viewed on an entirely different level. They are able to bring in the television stuff as content and make a response to it on a much different level and broader level than the other children. They might still entrain to it and go kind of catatonic with it as they would a storytelling but something more is happening because they simply have a wider neural basis on which to process that kind of a phenomena.

Essential Joseph Chilton Pearce 53

Play, Imagination, Television & Media
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Historically there were no movies, not until the mind 1920’s. Television did not arrive until 1950. Normal development was filled with rich diets of descriptive language, words without pictures which naturally developed the critical capacity for internal imagery. Today’s children experience over 6,000 hours of visual media stripped of descriptive language. Lacking imagination they are play deprived and don’t know what they are missing. Prior to the 1960’s when television became the national babysitter, children were bathed in story at home, at school and between themselves. Descriptive language was the dominate stimulus along with interaction with nature. Not today.

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