The Essential Joseph Chilton Pearce and More

Themes: 
bonding
media
parenting
wellness

Story Plus Play

Life is relationship. There is me, my authentic nature with its needs and curiosities and the cosmos expanding infinitely beyond me. What happens in the gap defines my life.

Children are sponges. Their rapidly changing brains and bodies compulsively seek new and different relationships that match the nova of neural connections exploding inside. We adulterated adults are in the Stone Age compared to the exponential brain growth found from the moment of conception to age eleven. Indeed the brain continues its expansive reach beyond eleven, but not as radically. The earlier in life the more profound and pronounced the changes, which means the greater the need for ever-changing appropriate things and relationships to engage.

Themes: 
bonding
learning
parenting
play
storytelling

Bonding Is Resonance - Resonance is Life

The weaver becomes the web. The more we relate to dead things the less alive we become. Emerson made this simple observation as the industrial revolution was pouring across the globe. The environment shapes development. Development shapes perception. Perception shapes reality. Reality projected outwardly shapes the environment and round and round we go.  Resonance….

Joseph Chilton Pearce made a profound and critical observation about virtual reality and the devices that produce them; they are dead, meaning they have no intrinsic resonate meaning, something all life forms share. They represent counterfeits of the mental imagery the most highly evolved regions of the brain evolved to generate. Exposure to counterfeits as the brain is developing (most importantly during the early stages and decreasing in importance through age eleven), retard the development of the capacities the counterfeit mimics.

One is bathed in living resonance sitting in the lap of a storyteller, hearts beating, nonverbal emotions, body contact, movement, temperature, order, touch and many other subtle fields of meaning. Holding a tablet or phone with a screen in your lap one is bathed in toxic microwave radiation. Yes, the senses are stimulated by lifeless counterfeits of living experience, startling bursts of sounds, moving colors, often frightening by design. Nature’s agenda is clear. We become the models we are given. At the turn of the century Emerson said: The weaver becomes the web. Joe’s insight is brilliant. Life and its meaning are defined by ‘resonance.’ Resonance is life itself. But we forget.

Prenatally the developing human is bathed in resonance. The first two years after birth are extremely sensitive. Attunement is the norm even if the adult is not tuning in. The developing brain is exploding with new and boundless possibilities all defined by resonance, that is, the nonverbal meaning of the model’s state. Nature assumes this model is a sensitive, available, attentive and attuned mother supported and nurtured by a father and extended family.

With the unfoldment of spoken language the child’s attention shifts to new internal imagery now generated by symbols and metaphors. As this new field of internal imagery expands attention shifts from the nonverbal meaning found in resonance to the play of words and relationships defined by words. The meaning of resonance slips in the background and is often forgotten, a tragic and unnecessary loss. What happens if the child’s models  are lost and absorbed in virtual reality and its counterfeits. If they, the models, are not sensitive, available, and attuned to resonance - what value will the child find in maintaining and developing this subtle capacity?

Imagine a developing human being interacting with a stimulating but dead technological environment. The model imperative and Epigenetics are lawful. They don’t care. Give a child dead counterfeits of living resonance and that is what you will develop in that child.

And down the slippery slope we go, bonded to dead virtual reality, increasingly unaware of what we have lost.

Themes: 
bonding
brain
environment

Making a Difference


A philanthropist asked: "With so many worthy nonprofit organizations and such need, what would you do? Where would you invest ten thousand or ten million dollars, and why?"

The answer, I maintain, depends on depth; treating symptoms or root causes. A person bleeding after an accident needs immediate attention. Stop the bleeding. Preventing the injury is more complex, more challenging. We need to do both.

Culture is the cause. Self-inflicted suffering and violence is the bleeding. Yes, self-inflected. In a recent interview the Dali Lama observed that we create most of our problems. Physicist David Bohm, protégé of Einstein, put it this way:

We are faced with a breakdown of general social order and human values that threatens stability throughout the world. Existing knowledge cannot meet this challenge. Something much deeper is needed, a completely new approach. I am suggesting that the very means by which we try to solve our problems is the problem. The source of our problems is within the structure of thought itself.

Collectively what Bohm calls thought expresses as Culture. Culture is our semantic-reality, the conditioned memories triggered by words, mental, emotional and physical images and our identification with these images. The culturally induced inner image we believe we are and the outer image we call culture emanate from the same root. Both are images. Both are, at close examination, the same. This insight is both obvious and profound. The difference between our personal image of self and the outer image we call culture is defined only by which end of the telescope we are viewing, near or far, inner or outer. The root of our personal and global conflict emanates from this image.

Themes: 
bonding
childhood
culture
parenting

To Me or Not to Me?

If there is a single force that generates inequality, violence and war throughout the world, other than the Central Bank, I vote for the self-image we create gazing up for assurance and approval as infants. At this early stage of development what emerges from that glance is not a fixed image, rather feelings: of acceptance, of care, welcoming, understanding, empathy, encouragement or their opposites; rejection, anger, frustration, neglect and the various forms of abuse.

Over time the repetition of these feelings coalesce, merge and form predictable patterns and these in turn create the scaffolding upon which our social identity is formed. Belonging means survival. Rejection could mean death. So we began to judge our worth and value based on the emotional reactions we experience in the mirror of our primary relationship.

Being accepted and maintaining the bond or attachment with mother extends to father, siblings, extended family, tribe and village. Instead of glances our value is based on comparison; our score, grade point average, nationality, race, profession, political party, social status, cast, club, gang, and religion. Our identity and self-worth are sculpted by the selfish needs of these social groups and within each sub-group is a pecking order forged by comparison, allegiance, obedience and conformity. Conflict, greed and war are implicit in this structure and this structure is based on mental-emotional images that forge our identity.

Themes: 
bonding
culture
parenting
praise/rewards
self image
violence

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