Advice for pregnant mothers

Advice for pregnant mothers
Advice for pregnant mothers

Keep a healthy body and keep a healthy mind as much as you can during this period.  With our own work, protein in the diet is terribly important, Vitamin B is important for the development of the brain, exercise to keep the placental circulation active, stay away from stress if possible.  The Japanese have said it for 2000 years, Tykio, think pleasant thoughts.  It's not always possible but recognize that what you are doing will influence the development of your infant.  And as much loving care between parents as possible.

D: Keep a healthy body and keep a healthy mind as much as you can during this period.  With our own work, protein in the diet is terribly important, Vitamin B is important for the development of the brain, exercise to keep the placental circulation active, stay away from stress if possible.  The Japanese have said it for 2000 years, Tykio, think pleasant thoughts.  It's not always possible but recognize that what you are doing will influence the development of your infant.  And as much loving care between parents as possible, and with your child as it is developing, even if it is in utero.

M: I experience bonding with my own child as a heightened sensitivity to what's going on in them, with how their feeling.  It's also been quite clear that my child was participating in my emotional states, not necessarily my thought but the total ambiance I was creating.  It seemed that they were sensitive to things that were happening beyond a physical touching.  Is there any model for this in current brain research?

D: I think it comes into the electro magnetism of the bodies and some give off more of a positive essence than others.  Animals pick it up, children can pick it up.  We don't understand how to measure it.  We were talking about this at lunch today, about how to measure these kinds of things that we're giving off, and thought waves as well.  We don't have the apparatus to pick these up yet, but our children sense them.  We know as adults which person we want to interact with.  There is a lot of room for discovery ahead and instrumentation will be refined so that we can measure these things in the future.  We know they're there, but how and in what quantities and how they're received, we don't know.

M: This is related to issues of parenting and the impact of role models. Can children develop beyond the model and environment that they are given?

D: I think that children can go beyond the role model that they're given.  As I always tell my students, I say see what's good out there, take what's good from everything that you see and combine it in yourself to be the person you want to be.  I firmly believe that you can bring in many different patterns through a life time.  At each stage as we go along, we see different kinds of role models, and if we don't see them, then we imagine them and make them up for ourselves as to what we want to be.

M: The word imagine adds a new dimension to this question.

D: I asked Issac Assamoff once, how he got the idea I found in one of his books.  He said, "Much more can come out of a brain than goes into a brain. " We have certain parts that are talking to each other, the right and left sides are talking to each other, so once we get information up there, the potential to interact is tremendous.  And that's the thrill. But that is the one area we can't measure very well.  But we do show, again with our rats, that with a nerve cell, different branches are receiving different information from different parts. Some are receiving sub-cortically, some intra-cortically, and we find with enriched environments that the branches that are receiving information intra-cortically are growing more that the branches that are receiving sub-cortically. So, once the information gets up there, it is having a lot more fun (integrating and crating) than simply information coming in.

Breastfeeding Bonding Prevents Infant Mortality And Suicide

The greatest terror a child can have is that he is not loved, and rejection is the hell he fears. I think everyone in the world, to a large or small extent, has felt rejection. And with rejection comes anger, and with anger some kind of crime in revenge for the rejection, and with the crime, guilt ~ and there is the story of mankind. John Steinbeck, East of Eden, 1952

Breastfeeding bonding and baby-carrying bonding are the first events of life, which the newborn/infant/child learns about love and non-violence. Love is first learned at the breast of mother and by being carried on her body ~ like in utero, where the first lessons of being connected with mother are learned.

Themes: 
abuse-neglect
bonding
brain
breastfeeding
culture
pleasure
pregnancy

Joseph Chilton Pearce

Author: 
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Joseph Chilton Pearce describes how birth impacts not only the mother and baby, but culture and society.

Ashley Montagu 04

Ashley Montagu 04
Ashley Montagu

Bonding is a word. But what does it mean? What it means is to bond with the first language of communication between the mother and her infant, which of course develops into eye contact, when you see the baby beginning to follow the mothers eye movement, reading her face expressions like a map, absolutely interpreting every expression. And the human face, it has been said, I don’t know, is capable of about 250,000 different expressions with sixteen muscles of expression on each side of the face. But the tactile experience, you see it is eye contact is the technical phrase by people who don’t know much about this, the touch of the eyes is very expressive, because it really means that you are doing what you are doing when you are actually touching the other body. And the expression of the eyes into our adult lives is very important. It tells the difference between indifference, between dislike, between love, friendship, and so on. And all this is connected to the word bonding.

As I was a professor in medical school I had an abundant opportunity to speak to mothers in the obstetrical department whose babies in those days in the early 30’s and 40’s were taken away into a so-called nursery which was so-called because there was no nursing was done in it. And the baby was literally abandoned to the prison into which it was put with perpendicular bars on each side, a white bed to lie on, white tiles covered with staph-infections, and that was the way to deal with newborn babies. Now if those babies had been completely abandoned it could not have been much worse because when those babies came back, and I saw after fourth eight hours, or even twenty-four hours, the mothers would use the same phrase, hello little stranger. And when I spoke with them, they all told me the same thing; if the baby had not been brought back they would not have noticed it.

Bonding is a word. But what does it mean? What it means is to bond with the first language of communication between the mother and her infant, which of course develops into eye contact, when you see the baby beginning to follow the mothers eye movement, reading her face expressions like a map, absolutely interpreting every expression. And the human face, it has been said, I don’t know, is capable of about 250,000 different expressions with sixteen muscles of expression on each side of the face. But the tactile experience, you see it is eye contact is the technical phrase by people who don’t know much about this, the touch of the eyes is very expressive, because it really means that you are doing what you are doing when you are actually touching the other body. And the expression of the eyes into our adult lives is very important. It tells the difference between indifference, between dislike, between love, friendship, and so on. And all this is connected to the word bonding.

Well the most important thing of course is the communication of love, the communication to the other that they have entered a safe harbor where he will be welcomed by everyone, nursed, nurtured and given every encouragement to grow and develop into a healthy human being. By healthy human being I mean the ability to love, the ability to work, the ability to play and the ability to use you mind critically.

See complete transcript https://ttfuture.org/academy/ashley-montagu/ashley-montagu

Ashley Montagu 03

Ashley Montagu

The basic pattern and patent of social behavior in the human species lies in the relation between mother and child. She has carried that child in a womb for 266 1/2 days, which is actually the average from conception to birth, not delivery. Doctors deliver babies but shouldn’t.

Babies get themselves naturally born in most cases, and that child is looking forward to a continuation of the life that it had in the womb. The temperature and pressure are constant, no work is required, and he or she is looking forward to a continuation of this. What they are looking forward to is a “womb with a view”.

But they are expelled rather roughly and usually taken away from their mother, which is wrong. It's physiologically/psychologically wrong. Both baby and mother need each other more at that time than they ever will again. The baby should be put to nurse at his mother’s breast whereupon it induces an enormous number of wonderful changes in the mother, such as an arresting of the postpartum hemorrhage, which no obstetrician can do under the circumstances, but a baby can do. Which indicates that there is more intelligence in the upper and the lower lip of one baby than all the brains of all the obstetricians put together.

There is love between those two. All of this is communicated through touch which would be lost if the baby was taken away from the mother and the mother would lose all the advantages she gains from the presence and the suckling of the baby. If you want to know what love is, interrupt what is going on between that mother and that baby.

See complete transcript https://ttfuture.org/academy/ashley-montagu/ashley-montagu

Ashley Montagu 05

Ashley Montagu 05
Ashley Montagu

Einstein once said to me; the most important trait of mine as a scientist and a thinker is fantasying. He was not a perfect English speaker but that is what he meant, imagination, day dreaming. He would agree I am sure. One day I hope I wake up and find that reality is really a fantasy. There is hope there.

Imagination is one thing we train out of children who are just the greatest of all imaginators, and it is a basic need, to be imaginative. Einstein once said to me; the most important trait of mine as a scientist and a thinker is fantasying. He was not a perfect English speaker but that is what he meant, imagination, day dreaming. He would agree I am sure. One day I hope I wake up and find that reality is really a fantasy. There is hope there. But without imagination which that child has, which goes with his curiosity, his exploreitivness, his asking constantly why? why, why? To which we say; go away, after all I have given you an explanation, and he isn’t satisfied. No great work of any kind would ever be achieved without imagination. It does not matter how competent you are at language, in the sense that you have a large vocabulary and can put words together very nicely. Imagination is much more important than any other cognitive trait for any being, for it is the one that is essential to creativity. And so, you teach children first of all to observe. He observes, she observes. That is not good enough. Observation is experimental. It weighs. It critically examines. It thinks about. But what do we do in our schools? We teach children what to think. Not how to think. And that is the critical difference between becoming an educated person, one who has not only leaned person but has become a learning person all the days of his or her life.

Ashley Montagu 02

Ashley Montagu 02
Ashley Montagu

We’re all born with physical needs, like the need for oxygen, for liquid, for rest, activity, sleep, and so on. These must be satisfied if we are to survive physically. The extraordinary thing is that we’re also born with basic behavioral needs. These are the need for love, about which we know very little, the need for creativity, the need for sensitivity, the need for learning, the need for the acquisition of knowledge, the need for play, for song, for dance, for curiosity, for imagination. All these are basic behavior needs, which are as much a part of our genetic system as the physical needs. Yet, we haven’t recognized them. Look at any textbook on the nature of human nature and you won’t find any mention of them.

The species characteristic of homo-sapiens, which by the way is the most officiously arrogant and primitive definition ever self-bestowed by a species. “Homo-Sap” is the appropriate definition at the present time, because he has become so confused as a creature, at the same time being the most intelligent. When you put intelligence and confusion together you really don’t get intelligence, you get a terrible mess.

To be born human is to be in great danger because you are free of the instincts which largely determine the behavior of other animals. We have to learn everything we come to know as human beings. We share a great many traits with other animals, yes, but those, which are exclusively human, we have to learn from others.

We know that we’re all born with physical needs, like the need for oxygen, for liquid, for rest, activity, sleep, and so on. These must be satisfied if we are to survive physically. The extraordinary thing is that we’re also born with basic behavioral needs. These are the need for love, about which we know very little, the need for creativity, the need for sensitivity, the need for learning, the need for the acquisition of knowledge, the need for play, for song, for dance, for curiosity, for imagination. All these are basic behavior needs, which are as much a part of our genetic system as the physical needs. Yet, we haven’t recognized them. Look at any textbook on the nature of human nature and you won’t find any mention of them.

If you would understand what human beings are born for, you first must understand what they’re born as, and this is what I have dedicated myself to, to attempt to show that we are borne with the capacity to love. But we will never know how to love unless we are taught to love, unless we learn to love others who know how to love. Not that it is impossible to correct this at any age, because we remain educateable all the days of our lives. It’s never too late. Love: what is love? Well, to spell it out briefly, it is the ability to communicate to others your profound involvement in their welfare, such that you will never commit the supreme treason of letting them down, whenever they most stand in need of you, and that you will minister to and encourage the growth and development of their potentialities. That’s love.

See complete transcript  https://ttfuture.org/academy/ashley-montagu/ashley-montagu

Ashley Montagu 01

Ashley Montagu 01
Ashley Montagu

Men would come up to me grasp me by the cheek give me a tremendously painful whirl, sometimes flick my ear and muss up my hair and say “what a nice boy you are”. Trying to understand why women and men were as they were led to my book, The Natural Superiority of Women, why education wasn’t what it should be led to my book Education and Human Nature in the Direction of Human Development, why aging isn’t what it should be led to Growing Young, and so on. I studied anatomy, embryology and zoology and the science of heredity. At the same time, I studied cultural anthropology and the history of science and medicine. All that early experience determined what I would become by way of solving this question, “what are human beings born for?”

Men would come up to me grasp me by the cheek give me a tremendously painful whirl, sometimes flick my ear and muss up my hair and say “what a nice boy you are”. Trying to understand why women and men were as they were led to my book, The Natural Superiority of Women, why education wasn’t what it should be led to my book Education and Human Nature in the Direction of Human Development, why aging isn’t what it should be led to Growing Young, and so on. I studied anatomy, embryology and zoology and the science of heredity. At the same time, I studied cultural anthropology and the history of science and medicine. All that early experience determined what I would become by way of solving this question, “what are human beings born for?”

See complete transcript  https://ttfuture.org/academy/ashley-montagu/ashley-montagu

 

Pregnancy, Birth & Bonding

Author: 
Joseph Chilton Pearce

The earlier the developmental stage the more sensitive and therefore critical. In this series Joe explores Pregnancy, Birth and Bonding, what nature expects and what intellectual interference has done to this miraculous process.

Pregnancy Birth & Bonding 04

Technological interference in a natural biological intelligence
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Doctors displaced women after World War II. Before World War II only thirty percent of women delivered in hospitals and even before World War I almost no women did, not in our country. After World War II ninety-seven percent of all women delivered in hospitals because the male surgeons, the medical establishment, outlawed midwifery in most places in the United States. It became illegal for woman to tend woman as they had down through the ages.

So let's look at what has happened.  In the past century or so we've had male surgeons who have suddenly begun to make in-roads, about a century or ago or more than that, on that which woman have done have done throughout the whole of history, since the dawn of time, women tended women at this most critical, crucial and vulnerable part of their whole life.

We seemed to muddle through as a species remarkably well against some overwhelming odds.  And then male surgeons began to come in as you can read, Suzanne Arms marvelous book of "Immaculate Deception" about the male surgeons first of all used the same instruments, of course they have to use instruments, they have no instincts for it so they use intellectual instruments and they use the same instruments that they used in their operating on people, cadavers and all that and the wholesale deaths from it was enormous.  At any rate they took over from women and in fact following World War II, before World War II, only about thirty percent of women delivered in hospitals and even before World War I almost no women did, not in our country.  Then after World War II ninety-seven percent of all women delivered in hospitals because the male surgeons, the medical establishment, outlawed midwifery as you know in most places in the United States.  So it became illegal for woman to tend woman as they had down through the ages.

I'm from the south, all of our black communities in the south delivered their infants always by mid-wives.  It was a practice that had gone on for untold millennia and you had this incredibly tight social cohesion in the southern black communities.  Most of our blacks lived in the south and I had an awful lot of interaction with them as a child because I was brought up by black nannies and helpers and keepers and I can tell you that the solidarity in those black communities was enormous.  They took care of their own.  There were no abandoned children.  If something happened to children there were a dozen Aunts and Uncles and Grannies and all.  Whether they were kin or not made no difference to take over and everyone loved every child.  Every child was nourished, handled and fondled and hugged by everybody and we find in those early communities before World War II and enormous cohesiveness those communities taking care of themselves.  Then we outlawed that midwifery and we broke up those birth patterns.

A woman by the name of Beverly in South Africa a number of years ago wrote two books.  She corresponded with me a bit about it.  On the breaking of the birth patterns among the Soolou's and Bandeus and the rest of the black communities in South Africa that had started a few years ago.  She said if you break up the birth patterns you will break up the whole social cohesive patterns holding those societies together.  You break up the whole behavioral patterns of those people and you're going to have chaos on your hands.  Isn't that interesting she made this statement a number of years ago and of course they paid no attention to her.  But now in our country breaking up the system of midwifery, which are black communities that held themselves together against overwhelming odds.  They held together against oppression that today you can't believe and poverty which was extreme and yet kind of came out on top as a people, and now are at war with themselves on every hand. In the majority of the black ghetto situations.  At the root of you will find the simple business of the interference of the mother's intelligence at the birth process itself.

World War II was certainly the watershed for this.  The other thing that made us differ is completely eliminate breast feeding.  Now this was a male doctor engineer process to eliminate breast feeding.  Ninety-seven percent of our mother's breast fed up until about World War II and after that three percent.  These are the three percent by in large, with a few exceptions, who delivered their children at home.  Only three percent of the children were delivered at home after World War II and they're the ones that continue to breast feed. Now, why breast feeding is important, in that I can't go into right now except that it is critically important.  It keeps the child constantly in contact with the mother's face in the first few months.  It takes about six to eight months for the whole visual process to myelinated and stabilize and the face cognition is the main thing.  It's the one pattern the brain is born with locked into its neural structures immediately at birth.  When the child opens theirs eyes they can recognize a face pattern and they will smile in response to that face pattern from the first moment of birth on which is nature's little trick she plays.  Now they can't recognize any other structural pattern but they can recognize a face pattern so we now that face pattern is built in.

This was the work of Fads and a whole bunch of medical doctors back in the sixties.  We know that pattern is built in as a neural, pre-structured neural system in the brain.  Simply awaiting the proper stimulus from the proper model out here, a human face but the face must be given at a distance at six to twelve inches.  The child cannot recognize that face pattern greater than twelve inches away and six to twelve inches is exactly the distance when the mother puts the infant to the left breast leaving that umbilical cord intact, they will spend eighty percent of their visual time locked in on that face pattern, twenty percent of their time looking out at other patterns and then referring right back to the known pattern of the face.  If they are given a face at six to twelve inches, if not the visual pattern fails to materialize and it will take anywhere from nine to twelve weeks for it to compensate and those visual patterns to finally start functioning.

So what we find happening with the result of male interference, male intellectual interference with the natural intelligence of woman and finally taking over completely and outlawing woman from having any part of it.  We find these things corresponding immediate rise of dysfunction’s in our children.  Fifty years ago there were zero cases recorded, or even known or even antidotal in American history of a suicide under age fourteen.  Today, according to NIMH in their in-depth studies, suicide reaches all the way down to age three. The American populous refuses to accept that idea.  

They attribute these early suicides always to accidents and you put these labels, keep out of reach of children, and all that.  No, these are deliberate suicides on the part of a three year old in their state of extreme anxiety and despair.  This has been pretty well established.  It's awfully hard to argue the statistics on this and every seventy-eight seconds a child in America attempts suicide right around the clock.  Now they don't all succeed.  It's harder to do than they think but this is a totally new anomaly in human history and it falls in exact correspondence with the beginnings of the male intellectual interference of technological childbirth with the natural processes that the woman would take care of.

We get into a whole raft of other things.  I think it's interesting that there's a direct corresponding rise in the incidence of birth cancer with the elimination of breast feeding. Only three percent of our mother’s breast fed after World War II.  I simply ask you to look and you'll see an immediate corresponding increase of breast cancer.  Of course the breast was no longer for feeding infants, it's for advertising purposes and male pleasures and so on and so forth.  Breast feeding becomes a cultural embarrassment.  It really does.  And in many places illegal to do in public and woman were arrested for indecent exposure.

I invite you to go to some of the other foreign countries and watch the, in Switzerland, which is a very beautiful benign country, the woman casually on the, lining the Lake Zurich there, everybody goes out to Lake Zurich for their lunch break and they will sit there bare-breasted and there are little children playing all around and coming up and grabbing a little nip every few minutes, the little toddlers.   No one thought anything about it.  That's what breasts were for.  In our country it became of course a cultural embarrassment and woman themselves are seriously embarrassed over the idea.  
 

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