The Belonging Hoax

Of course we need to belong. Life is relationship. The words abandonment, bonding and attachment rest on the primacy of belonging. The relatively new field of epigenetics, the way the environment shapes gene expression, molding the very essence of life to the ever-changing environment, demonstrates how important it is to belong. Belonging is a matter of life and death, and deep down, we know it.

Themes: 
culture
freedom
parenting
human potential

Where do we go from here?

What follows is a synthesis of forty-years with J. Krishnamurti, David Bohm, Joseph Chilton Pearce, Samdhong Rinpoche and other mentors. The passion, clarity and hope that inspired these teachers etched deeply and took root. I see what I see standing on their shoulders.

Themes: 
human potential
parenting
education
culture

Bruce Lipton

Author: 
Bruce Lipton

Bruce H. Lipton, PhD began his scientific career as a cell biologist. He is an internationally recognized leader in bridging science and spirit. Stem cell biologist, bestselling author of The Biology of Belief and recipient of the 2009 Goi Peace Award, he has been a guest speaker on hundreds of TV and radio shows, as well as keynote presenter for national and international conferences. He has been a guest speaker on hundreds of TV and radio shows, as well as keynote presenter for national and international conferences.

Daily Yoga

Author: 
Judy Anderson

This 70 minute daily yoga program is a wonderful full body routine that can be adapted for just about anyone. In-Joy. mm

Joe Dispenza

Author: 
Joe Dispenza

Joe Dispenza, D.C., first caught the public’s eye as one of the scientists featured in the award-winning film What the BLEEP Do We Know!? Since that movie’s release in 2004, his work has expanded, deepened, and spiraled in several key directions—all of which reflect his passion for exploring how people can use the latest findings from the fields of neuroscience and quantum physics to not only heal illness but also to enjoy a more fulfilled and happy life. Dr.

Continuing Adult Development

Continuing Adult Development
Joseph Chilton Pearce

I love the comment of Bernadette Roberts, that probably we think of as spiritually realm is simply physical maturation, the true maturation of the human being, becoming a fully mature human being. And there are even levels beyond that. I think of the incorporating of the three structures of the brain, what we call the ancient reptilian brain is incorporated into the mammalian brain and we’ve become mammalian simply in order to incorporate that into the human brain and we come fully human simply to incorporate that into what we project as the divine or the spiritual and so forth and we incorporate that in to, then into the true fully unknown of creation itself.

I think here we’re talking about the development that should unfolded at adolescence. And only now are we beginning to move beyond Piaget and all the rest of those schematics, which were quite accurate by in large by they all are essentially only for the first fifteen years or so. And what about the mature adult life and the new theories that have begun to really come up about the developmental stages beyond there? Now of course, Rudolph Steiner and some others had talked about these developmental stages that we’re all expecting at adolescence and very few of us ever are fortunate enough to experience them.

And these have been I think king of projected into the whole realm of a spiritual realm. It’s not a bad word, I’m not against the word, but here we’re talking about processes rather than products. We’re talking about the realm of the mind to move into pure abstraction, let’s say.  I recall that David Bohm didn’t like that term “abstraction” at all but the ability of the mind to move beyond any known boundaries into moving into kind of the infinite aspects that are also enfolded within the brain.

We do know that the neo-cortex is not being developed and we do know there’s parts of the neo-cortex that are developed, are in response to the whole physiological homeostatic processes of the body and the physical world. And so, what would all the rest of the brain be about for the developmental of the potentials of an inner world, first of all, which means just not that which is physical and material but on another level. In Quantum Mechanics we could certainly say that it would be moving from the particle perception into the wave perception which is all just metaphoric.  A far more powerful insight would be David Bohm’s moving from the explicit order of development and using that as our platform to stand on and move into a realization of the potentials of an implicate order of energy that gives rise to the external world. From there to move on, actually into the causal forces of the universe itself, which are again, are enfolded within the potentials of our brain structure and only awaiting what, the appropriate models and the appropriate nurturing environment. 

So that’s what I call post-operational thinking the others have, I’m picking up on that common term and that is the real realm of the human spirit and that’s the whole purpose. That’s evolution’s end. That’s what the whole summation of life is all about.

I love the comment of Bernadette Roberts, that probably we think of as spiritually realm is simply physical maturation, the true maturation of the human being, becoming a fully mature human being. And there are even levels beyond that. I think of the incorporating of the three structures of the brain, what we call the ancient reptilian brain is incorporated into the mammalian brain and we’ve become mammalian simply in order to incorporate that into the human brain and we come fully human simply to incorporate that into what we project as the divine or the spiritual and so forth and we incorporate that in to, then into the true fully unknown of creation itself. And so we have this magnificent kind of scenario available within the structures of our brain and simply not there. I mean they’re there but they’re not available and so our great challenge is how to access them and open to them. And it’s funny to say we start that in-utero and with that birth process.

What can parents do?

What can parents do
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Your change unfortunately has to start with the adult and everyone is thinking the change has to start in children. That, if we just have a different way of engineering children, you know a new curriculum in school and this, that and the other and change will take place. Some of this is partly true. For instance if you really did start and educate children in school about the developmental system, about what is even happening within themselves, what’s going on in their own brain system, what’s going on in the growth process, the high selectivity of the brain and how all that works, just that, the idea of intelligences as fields which are there available, and so on and how we access them.

Well I think first of all that would require an enormous kind of moral effort on the part of the parent to, what was this mindful alertness that Krishnamurti talked about, that the Zen people talk about, George Jaydar talks about it all the time, simply monitoring ones reactions to make sure that we’re not falling back into old patterns. This takes a lot of effort. One of the things I have found that parent’s do is they will automatically respond to their children as their parents responded to them. They can’t help it. This is a pattern ingrained very early. And one of the biggest ways in which this occurs is a parent prescribing the child’s behavior without ever knowing it and the child then perforce fulfilling that prophecy. They act out the prescription. Parents and their question, they way they present things to children continually. I’ve heard a parent say, oh, you don’t feel well this morning do you? What’s the matter dear? Or about food, try this, you might not like it, and so on.  Now here are the prescriptions of behavior and ambiguity that’s continually presented the child through prescriptions of behavior. And all this would have to be suspended. One would have to check all that because it’s through that that we impose the same limitations that we had imposed on us and we do it automatically. So it’s a very difficult thing. It’s like Plato’s statement: “Give me a different set of mothers and we’d have a different world,” which is not to castigate women at all, it’s just simply saying the mother is such a powerful, incredible presence and force on the emerging mind, brain. She is the environmental stimulus and inevitably it’s going to replicate itself. And so to break out of a cultural fixation is very difficult.

M:        I think that that’s our challenge though.

J:          it’s a tremendous challenge.

M:        I would like to focus the rest of whatever we’re talking about with this notion in mind, that the model imperative which we haven’t talked about yet, but I think our real task is not to bring about a new generation of children. Our real task is to transform the model.

J:          Your change unfortunately has to start with the adult and everyone is thinking the change has to start in children. That if we just have a different way of engineering children, you know a new curriculum in school and this, that and the other, that will take place. Well now some of that is partly true. F or instance if you really did start and educate children in school about the developmental system, about what is even happening within themselves, what’s going on in their own brain system, what’s going on in the growth process, the high selectivity of the brain and how all that works, just that, the idea of intelligences as fields which are there available, and so on and how we access them.  Because there would be a lot more attention to the human being as a human being rather than attention to preparations for the gross national product or anything like that. Then that couples with real concentration on being a parent, to change a parent’s whole pattern of response to a child. That’s what you would have to do to break cultural deadlocks or gridlocks such as we face right now. And when none of our old techniques are working and we can’t break out of them and that is not moral failure. It’s no one’s fault. These ingrained, imprinted processes control us.

M:        How would we do it Joe?

J:          There’s where information does help.  I think that face that the triangular structure of the brain and the behavioral patterns locked into the more primary brains, should be calling primitives since they’re so magnificently sophisticated but the two we share with all other species, on some level, that those structures once activated operate autonomously and literally furnish us the only world we know.  Even in examination of some of the striking differences between realities experienced by different cultural patterns of child rearing, as in the Australian Aborigine or the Coo-hari-coom, literally is one of the few most extraordinary, almost paranormal societies on Earth, not from the standpoint they have any models for us but the fact that the model factor works the way it does. If we could open up some things like that and begin to realize that these two primary systems once formed are literally immutable. All we can ever do is transcend them. Now there we get into where I think some of our religious attempts have failed. The Eastern denigration of the body, the degrading, the denial of the body and trying to get rid of it and the denial of in effect these early imprints which we have to have to have a universe at all and so. On the one hand, and all the various problems we have, on these fixed kind of immutable patterns, if we just understood their operations you see and could admit to ourselves that the majority of things that happen within us are not within our control.  And then we can look at the ways in which we can begin to monitor these earlier systems with our higher intellectual brain system.

Amazing Capacities

Our amazing capacities and self-inflicted limitations
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Here Joe describes the heart of his life quest, to understand our amazing capacities and self-inflicted limitations. ‘Crack was simply a great huge protest. It was literally kind of a cry of protest that was far more than was being allowed on the current scene. I had started writing it while teaching in a most conservative college and a most conservative state, Virginia. At the same time grappling with such things as degrees and Ph.D.’s and so on and so forth and the enormous demands. And the narrowing down, the constant narrowing down and exclusion of things in order to toe the line, in order to be politically correct which was true then on certainly a very rigid level.’

 

 

It started with my writing of the “Crack in the Cosmic Egg” and I was looking at all the phases of my own life and of my children’s life and there were a whole series of things that happened that were inexplicable within any modern academics, scientific framework.  And it wasn’t that I was interested in the paranormal or the occult or anything else.  It just seemed to build a whole series of events that would not fit in with any normal paradigm and I wondered in looking at my self in my own life and I know there were critical points in my life when my potential was really very high.  And I knew it and I sensed it.  I intuitively expected certain things to happen. 

And instead you might say environmental disasters occurred which literally were so shattering that I could feel things simply eroding and disappearing, slipping between my fingers. 

And I began to realize what I would now term to be betrayed by a primary caretaker, literally fractured, it’s like taking a piece of glass and fracturing it.  Things don’t come back to focus after that.  You’re compensating rather than functioning.  And then moving up and pretending to observe my children I would see certain things unfold in them literally and then simply decay or disappear, it’s fine.  And I began to wonder what it is.  What is the potential that unfolds and what is it that disappears? 

The Crack was simply a great huge protest.  It was literally kind of a cry of protest that was far more than was being allowed on the current scene.  I had started writing it while teaching in a most conservative college and a most conservative state, Virginia, and at the same time grappling with such things as degrees and Ph.D.’s and so on and so forth and the enormous demands.  And the narrowing down, the constant narrowing down and exclusion of things in order to tow the line, in order to be politically correct which was too thin on certainly a very rigid level.  Here was my own life which had this series of extraordinary things that had happened, particularly in my 23rd year when a whole for months and months and months what has been called paranormal things occurred and in quite striking ways. And to me they were simply indications of what was really there and the enormous tendency of us to screen those out on behalf of a far more timid limited and apparently safe but deadly common consensus.  And so my book which I worked on for 12 years was started off and for a long time remained a protest against my teaching colleagues for their own narrow way of thinking.  And then the things had occurred in my graduate work in different travels, ran across this stone wall. 

Now you either come around to the conventional way of thinking or you simply can’t make that kind of a grade.  And the great crisis I found I came to, you can either continue writing the book Crack or go and head on to the degree program and continuing in college and the great crisis of that, which was a long drawn out thing, and I found I had to leap off of a cliff with my wife and four children on my back, so to speak, and on behalf of going for what I felt to be true.  So then my second book follows up on Crack and I would then stumble across the whole thing of child development in the Pieje and Montesorri and others had not dealt these stages which I had sensed but I couldn’t articulate.  One thing leads to another and the picture grows and grows and grows.  Then I began giving those seminars as I wrote Magical Child, just simply to explore ideas in public. I’d throw it out and get shot down and that was perfectly alright with me.  I had no image to defend.  I was really looking for exploring a whole series of phenomena in our lives.  And so by the time I finally got the book published I received from my audiences already a great deal of material that changed the shape of that book and then from there on I found myself caught up in, I often thought that I got type-cast like a Hollywood movie person, I’d gotten type-cast with child business.  And I started branching away from that bond of power and when Magical Child material came along as a way of trying to correct the errors of Magical Child, the shortcomings and that’s the way it’s gone.  But now of course I’m locked into that grid of concerns over childhood.  My original viewpoint was far broader than that.  I was looking at the whole kind of cosmic drama we’re caught up in and how we limit ourselves, why we limit ourselves, and what our dimensions really are.

Beyond Adolescence

Incorporating the lower into the higher
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Eckhart caught on when he said "when the higher incorporates the lower into its structure, it changes the lower into the nature of the higher".  And it was George Leonard who caught onto that about sexuality.  That actually in this intense peak of emotion of adolescent love that that could in itself be a way by which we could enter in to this whole realm of the spirit, but something happens and instead it ends up generally for us a disaster.

Now in all of our spiritual traditions, nearly all of them, we have the idea of denial.  Evolutions problem is this, to wean us away from our identity with lower evolutionary structures and instead use those as the foundation to move on in higher evolutionary structures.  It's just that simple.  That's what it's been for a long time, we've intuitively known that for a long time.  What then have we tried to do in the past? 

At root of nearly every great spiritual system, and this isn't to denigrate them, they're all mind boggling and vastly beyond me, but at root of them as they form into strict religious structures, the concept of denial comes in.  How are we going to wean ourselves away from these lower structures?  Well we try to deny them.  We try to cut ourselves off from them.  In periods of great religious frenzy back in Greece, the young men used to run out and emasculate themselves on behalf of the goddess.  Why?  To try to cut themselves off in effect from all aspects of the lower structures.  And of course this is tremendously self-destructive.

This isn't what evolution is about at all.  Eckhart caught on when he said "when the higher incorporates the lower into its structure, it changes the lower into the nature of the higher".  And it was George Leonard who caught onto that about sexuality.  This is something I claimed in my fourth/fifth book, "Magical Child Matures".  That actually in this intense peak of emotion of adolescent love that that could in itself be a way by which we could enter in to this whole realm of the spirit, but something happens you see, something happens and instead it ends up generally for us a disaster.

This is part of what the adolescent period is all about.  This longing for completion.  Now I made a serious error in my book "Magical Child Matures", and I perpetuated that error in evolutions end.  I saw this longing in the adolescence to be the open, longing for the opening of another development period.  I was exactly right with that.  There's no question.  There are a lot of books coming out now about post-operational thinking, what should happen after 15.  Some brilliant work is being done. 

At 15 instead of a closure there should be a brain growth spurt.  There is no way around that.  And, then the regular 3 1/2 to 4 year cycles, we should go through a series of developments precisely as we did in the first 15 years.  There's no question about it.  And these should be the discovery of what we could call the wave form aspect of the particle world that we have created and come into dominion over.  We just simply, the ability to move up into higher and higher echelons or realms of the whole creative process.  This is being recognized little by little and it makes perfectly good clear sense. 

The only problem is to assume that this the great inner venture of the spirit on the part of that adolescent won't work, it won't fit the adolescent.  Adolescents just don't fit that pattern.  Why?  They are completely locked into their hormonal life, into their life in this body, the great delight in the body and the desperate need to move out into the social world and prove themselves.  All of which is a critical part of nature's plan.  But, as they go out to explore the world and all that it offers, exactly as they should, becoming a part of society and becoming the parents and all of that at that period, at the same time all of that should be preparing them for the final maturation which is the movement into the realm of the unknown or the true spiritual realm that evolution is pushing us toward.

So I think from probably about 15 to 30 we're simply going through a developmental period to lay the ground work, the bridging between, the localized experience here in the world and the totally non-localized experience of what we generally lump under the heading of the spirit.  What we need is a new lexicon of the spirit.  We need a completely new vocabulary to cover this, why, I think we've ruined all the other old words concerning it.  They're tarnished.  They've been overloaded with such nonsense that they're no longer much worth to us.

Carl Ume once said, "when a symbol loses it's power, you simply have to let it go" and most of our great symbols have lost their power and I think it's because of the mis-use of those symbols and now we need kind of a new symbology of the spirit.  IN this period which I would call the transition period from our complete embeddedment in this marvelous, and what should be a very joyful life of the body, toward the joyful life of the body of the spirit because it's always the body.  We're always the body.  There's no doubt of that, even when we move into a hypothetical pure spiritual would still be the body.  In that transition stage, that is adolescence you see and during that time we lay all the ground work for this final stage to unfold which should occupy our entire mature years and certainly you would find a different ballgame than we have today, and the great despair we have in our older people and so on.

There was a woman who wrote a book called "Passages" which was really similar to some of the young improvisations and others, had something to be said for it.  I thought maybe some profound errors, there's no need to go into that, but if it's really looking at these stages through the eyes of the world, a folly, that is the disasters that befall us, and you won't really get a clear image that way.  You have to look at it through the eyes of your greatest beings we've ever had if you want to get a clear idea of what this is all about. 

The new lexicon of the spirit, and I think post-operational thinking is a very good term for this intermediate period that we see the adolescent moving into.  We would then find the overall cycle of our life falling beautifully into this cycle of competence pattern.  Our first 15 years we've roughed in the whole ballgame right.  We've roughed it all in.  The second 15 years we need to fill in the details by getting out there and doing it, becoming it, taking it on ourselves to be that great figure, the adult, the parent and the society and so on.  And then comes what?  The period of practice and variation?  Yes, in a way, and moving into the realm beyond our identity or being locked into the identity with these lower structures. 

Am I making any sense?  This is that anguish of adolescence.  That's why if you come along to the adolescent who's totally hormonal on the one hand and in this anguish of longing on the other and you talk to him about misplaced libido and so on and so forth, and you must discipline and give us this and give up that and the other if you want to know the spirit, something is wrong.  You see, something is wrong.  So I look at most of our great disciplines which have depended on what, denial, which is at vase a trade-off and how much greater, how much more it fits the evolutionary pattern to think of incorporation of the lower into the higher and transformation.  Transcends, moving beyond, but as you move beyond everything goes with it.  Everything goes with it or it's not a whole movement.  So that's what is involved in adolescence and that's evolutions intent.  They're getting ready for the opening and the focus on those frontal lobes but the frontal lobes aren't even complete in the adolescence, they're not complete until early maturity.

Now you say frontal lobes, what could that possibly have to do with anything?  I ask you to recall again what all current scientific evidence strongly points toward, that our universe organizes itself within the neurons of our brain and presents itself to us that way.  We interpret it as an external event which it is as the result of this operation.  This isn't to deny the reality of the outer world, it's simply to say our perception of the outer world is an interior construction by the brain's system.  And in the brain system, with its hundreds of billions and trillions of neuro connections and possibilities can translate into our experience of perception of the whole universal scheme of things.  If it can do that, than these great frontal lobes which represent a huge chunk of it, it's estimated that only about 10% of the neocortex is actually developed.  It might all be involved, if the integrated circuitry it is, but we don't develop a great deal of it.  There's a difference between development and usage, you use it out of default because it's going to respond.  But in lack of development it responds very weakly.  Does that make any sense? 

I've used the analogy of usage as opposed to development because this will take care of all the arguments in the scientific people if they would just look at it.  In regard to muscles, as I say my warranties running out, times getting late, but I'm very active, I use every muscle in my body every day I'm sure.  But I should show you the sad strings hanging about my limbs, which I will spare you, you would see a striking, an unbelievable difference between those sad strings and the huge durgeable, the blimps, the great big enormous balloons on the arms and chests of our muscle men who push weights, and muscle women who push weights you see.  That is, both of us use our muscles but one of us develops our muscle.  Just which on you see.  The difference is astonishing. 

Now, we all use everything in the brain, but how much of it do we develop, that's the whole issue.  We use it by default, we have nothing to do with it.  There is the possibility of developing it.

Beyond Adolescence

Feelings of hidden greatness
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Brain researcher Marianne Diamond says, “If you challenge the brain enough, it will continue to develop throughout life", but all of this is on a different level than we talked about before. All these first 15 years have been devoted to what, coming into dominion over this whole physical process and then by 15, sexuality has appeared and what is sexuality all about? At the same time, intuitively the young person knows their erratically incomplete. We call on the silent areas of the brain, these frontal So therein lays the key of what the adolescent is all about.  They realize this incompleteness.  Now we say why do they always gesture toward their heart?  And they do, because all of these are felt as great yearnings of the heart and this isn't just metaphoric, it's felt physically as a pressure in the heart that comes up like a lump in the throat.

And the third issue is the feeling of hidden greatness as a person.  Hidden greatness.  I remember at 16 I was working a full-time job under an emergency full-time civil service job and quite an anonymous little person and I used to think, I completely filled myself, I was just exploding with this hugeness inside and I used to think now here I'm walking down the street or a completely unknown, if they, you know how teenagers are always referring to "they", if they just knew who I really was they'd all stand back and make way for me.  But I didn't know what this was myself and I would wonder, how, how am I ever going to let them know how incredibly great I really am?  And doesn't that register with us all, that teenage period?  This feeling of secret hidden uniqueness?  Nothing like me could have ever happened before. 

When I first read Thomas Wolfe, the original Thomas Wolfe back in the 30's, "Look Homeward Angel, You Can't Go Home Again", "Of Time and the River", these were great huge monuments written back then and remarkable works because he expressed this whole thing as perfectly as it's ever been expressed in this world.  So did Salinger in "Catcher in the Rye".  You'll pick up a lot of this from that.  And so this is the plight of the teenager, know what is going on?  Very simply let's look back, here we go again to those growth spurts and developmental periods, birth, age 1, 4, 7, 11 and then we speak of 15 as everybody saying well it's all over with.  Piaget didn't see any signs of any further developmental stages.  Rudolph Steiner did.  He supplied that the full mature ego doesn't even appear until age 21.  He spoke of much further developmental stages.  But none of the biologically oriented developmentally astute.  Karl Jung spoke of stages going beyond that, and no one else did.   Now we do know that the brain seems to myelinated completely and there's no further brain growth spurts we can detect and so on. 

Marianne Diamond says, “If you challenge the brain enough, it will continue to develop throughout life", but all of this is on a different level than we talked about before.  What's really supposed to happen, here we go again, this has to I suppose be hypothetical, even though I know it's not hypothetical, is that what's really supposed to happen.  Here we go again with those three levels of the brain.  We're still, all these first 15 years have been devoted to what, coming into dominion over this whole physical process and all of the learnings that have taken place have related to this rightly so and then at 15, by 15, sexuality has appeared and what is sexuality all about?

Well, it's still drowning us in the physical isn't it.  It's a very happy drowning.  Drowning us in the physical, re-focusing our attention on it, we become completely hormonal at that point and vitally aware of our body and so on.  And it also locks us into our society because only through this regular social channels can that sexuality achieve its end.  Now, all of that though, nevertheless, is essentially physically oriented to complete the species, species propagation and so on and so forth.  At the same time, intuitively the young person knows their erratically incomplete.  Here we get to the issue that all current research is heavily indicating.  It's a big debatable issue and you can't find any consensus about it.  But, very strong suspicion that the great frontal lobes, the frontal lobes that are evolutions latest thing, are absolutely not developed at 15. 

We call on the silent areas of the brain, the recent research, which I think is most exciting is that that I've mentioned three times now, this is my fourth time I know, that these frontal lobes are still laying down their tracks throughout childhood.  Still completing their development throughout adolescence and not fully mature and ready to function totally, that is the focus of development on until early maturity.  So therein lays the key of what the adolescent is all about.  They realize this incompleteness.  Now we say why do they always gesture toward their heart?  And they do, because all of these are felt as great yearnings of the heart and this isn't just metaphoric, it's felt physically as a pressure in the heart that comes up like a lump in the throat. 

Thomas Wolfe spoke of it as the "great bursting in the throat of this anguished longing".  What it is is the intelligence of the heart, now remember, you have to go back to what we were talking about, the heart is an endocrine gland and all those other recent discoveries of the role the heart plays, particularly with the limbic structure and organizing the functions of the limbic system, the emotional relational brain.  And then we have to go one step further and we find that the, according to Paul MacLean, the area of the limbic system.  The highest part of this great secondary or mammalian brain system, we have what he calls "species survival itself" and branching into, directly into, and has apparently very close connections with the frontal lobes.

Now briefly, and this is hypothetical, the reason that anguish is felt here is because you have whatever this mysterious unified field is within us that we call this kind of universal process, is literally longing for its expression and it's full opening into its expression through its instrument called the brain.  All the rest of this brain structure has been devoted to what?  To simply giving us our experience of a physical life and a physical body and our interaction and relationship with it, our ability to pro-create and do all these other things and keep the show going and now we're ready to open up what?  An area that is absolutely un-programmed.  Paul MacLean said, "well these frontal lobes seem to have to do with compassion, a kind of universality, sympathy, love, nurturing, care, we find that is apparent of what is awakened by the infant/mother interaction at birth which awakens in her a compulsion, a passion that seizes her whole life to nurture that infant at all costs.  Why?  Because it's connected with those frontal lobes.  And so now we have the possibility that through that mother/infant interaction the mother would find the entrance and access into her own frontal lobes and all of the possibilities that they contain, literally, the child in teaching the mother instant by instant might lead her into her own greatest realms of being. 

George Leonard in his recent book about sexuality gives strong indication that at the highest levels of sexuality it would literally access the frontal lobes themselves you see.  And read that, this is a very profound work.

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