Quality of life vs. Standard of living

Quality of life vs. Standard of living
Joseph Chilton Pearce

It started long before but World War II was the final water shed of these five major things that I pick on and they’re only kind of five mountain tops of the intellects interference with the natural process and then of course the fact that this creates problems vastly faster than the intellect can solve and finally the culture self-destructs from the overload of insoluble problems.

The interesting thing about the quality of life as opposed to standard of living, as the quality of life erodes we adjust to it. We used to have what we called grading on the Bell Curve. You put your most stupid student down here and he got the F, your brightest student got the A.  the bulk of them fell in the middle and got a C. What was found, and this was in many, many states and their classroom experience was if we gauged our presentation and our whole focal point on the C student, the whole curve slid toward the idiot end. We had to concentrate on a presentation for the A student with the A student as the model and that kept the curve stable. 

Now it rapidly became undemocratic to do that. This was not fair. And as a result the curve started sliding downhill. Your model imperative is right there. Quality of life must be held always as the prime goal, as the prime consideration and then standard of living will have to take care of itself. But as quality starts eroding, if we treat that erosion, the eroding state as our norm, it can only contribute to the erosion itself.

So now we are all getting immune to violence. The teenager is immune to violence. It’s an accepted aspect of life. There used to be in a state of high fear and anxiety and rage. This is the human norm now. We don’t know of anything else, so to speak, as a society. We’re actually losing our capacity to conceive of anything other than the rather terrifying situation in which we are rapidly moving. So the problem of standard of living, which we substitute for that, here we keep cranking up more and more goals for a better standard of living in which we think will then institute the quality of life, which of course is a radical error. 

One of the things I’ve been doing is pointing up to five unprecedented, historically unprecedented, phenomena that have occurred, particularly in the last 50 years, that have eroded the quality of life, that have literally brought about severe changes and those of course were first of all hospital technological childbirth and then the daycare is a result of hospital childbirth not economic factors. And then television, and there the problem is not the content but the problem is the neural damage. That is the same kind of neural damage that’s being created by the other two things; the failure of the system to open up and development but close into the lowest defense processes. And then the attempt that we’ve been making to interfere with the natural growth pattern of the child, not allowing the child to be a child but to try to make them prematurely highly precocious intellectual adults, which we do out of our fear of the child not surviving the economic world and achieving a high standard of living, even though that’s bought at the price of the quality of life. 

And so in Japan where they’ve become completely mad over there, then of course the suicide level of their children too has increased at any enormous rate. And then finally looking at the way intellect and the fears of the intelligence of the system, the introduction of the various kinds of chemical hormonal, synthetic chemical hormonal processes into the meat, dairy and poultry industries, which is again for economic gain, and seriously break up the genetically encoded growth patterns of the child so we have premature sexuality now in 8 and 9 year old, both males and females. They’re getting the ability to beget and conceived and we have hostile forcible rape at an all time epidemic high in 9 year old males and pregnancies in 9 year old girls. Menarche in 8 year old girls is at an all time high and people don’t realize that this has never happened before in human history. There’s no historical precedent for it at all. But we rapidly began to adjust to that and we simply assume that children are, you know they are always sexual, and we assume that these adult processes are just occurring in the children for a number of reasons. 

The question is would we have so interfered with nature and brought about such a wildly imbalanced destructive process had we not first of all been cut off or again the separation factor? To be cut off from the mother artificially or arbitrarily is to be cut off from nature. It’s to isolate us and alienate us from that which we then turn around and try to dominate.

I’m sure one of the reasons for our high degree of battering of women by males is because having been cut off from that which is so terribly critical to our well-being, cut off from it arbitrarily, then it becomes… the source of our greatest need becomes the source of our greatest fear you see. And having betrayed us once, to the child, the infant male cut off from the mother, he has been abandoned by her and he will never again trust a female in the same way because he’s the source of the greatest pain he can ever conceive of, is that terrible abandonment that he knows. And the same way with the greater mother of the earth, I’m convinced that there’s a great correlation between the rape of the earth, as we call it, going on now, the rape of women going on now between males, and a male intellect that is cut off from the mother, that separation factor at birth.

And this started after all, it’s interesting enough, back in the 19th Century and even before when it first began only in the highest levels of society. First of all in the royalty, only the wealthy, the primitive poor still delivered in a natural fashion. And so we find the rise of, for instance, a highly technological scientific mind willing to unleash on earth a hundred million tons of violent carcinogenic waste a year. The rise of that came from your higher intellectual levels of your society who then unleashed kind of the whole technological nightmare, industrial nightmare, on the world, all of which again is bought at a complete disregard of the consequences to the body of the self or world. And so you are quite right.  We can’t say it started with World War II, it started long before but World War II was the final water shed of these five major things that I pick on and they’re only kind of five mountain tops of the intellects interference with the natural process and then of course the fact that this creates problems vastly faster than the intellect can solve and finally the culture self-destructs from the overload of insoluble problems.

What I learned today with Carly Elizabeth - Nine weeks old

In the quiet moments when Carly melts into my arms there is attunement, resonance, shared meaning, trust, respect, appreciation, curiosity, wonder, all moving, changing and so much more, embodied, nonverbal, silent. This silent, reciprocal attunement is the essence of bonded-attachment and that creates a safe-place for play.

Themes: 
bonding
culture
parenting
play

Beyound Adolescence

The radically changing female role
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Now let's look at how the female role has changed since World War II. 100 years ago 96% of the population of America lived on farms.  The farm was the whole life blood of the nation, 96% of the population lived there.  By World War II, by the end of World War II 4% of the American population lived on farms, 95% lived in the cities.

Now let's look at a couple of other things, and I've got to do this in a hurry, female role has changed dramatically since World War II.  Let's look back.  There is just a marvelous book that came out about the role of women and the whole history of early America.  We have women in the kitchen.  The woman in the kitchen but, the kitchen of what, the American farm.  100 years ago 96% of the population of America lived on farms.  The farm was the whole life blood of the nation, 96% of the population lived there.  What was the heart of the farm?  The kitchen.  A farmer without a wife in America was absolutely crippled.  What did she do?  She ran the kitchen, the heart of the whole enterprise.  She ran the kitchen gardens, the putting up of all the food, the taking care of the cows and the chickens, the source of their direct food.  She kept the books, literally.  She was the bookkeeper of the organization.  She brought the children into the world, she nurtured them, she fed them, she fed the hired hands, she educated the children, whatever education they got, and they all ended up remarkably well educated by in large, certainly all literate.  All of this she did.  She was the kingpin.  Literally the hub around which this huge enterprise called the farm rested. 

Read their accounts of life in those days and don't think it was grim, it was not necessarily grim at all.  I've read magnificent, glorious accounts of her role in that time and how she met it and the joys therein.  This also was the extended family.  She was the hub of an extended family which was not just a nuclear family of mother, father and child, but a great extended family.  There were many people there to help her, to take over, to give her rest a bit from those children and so on and so forth, and so it was a big give and take and a community in itself. 

Little by little this started changing dramatically and by World War II, by the end of World War II 4% of the American population lived on farms, 95% lived in the cities.  Now what do you have happening?  You have a woman whose place is in the home and whose place in the home is in the kitchen, that isn't the hub of anything.  You see, all of the sudden the kitchen doesn't mean anything.  You have all sorts of prepared foods, the kitchen's an instantaneous place, it doesn't require much and so on, and you have this whole huge industry to fill that kitchen with what it needs and so she doesn't really need to even be there so to speak, and we say, ah, the mother's place is in the home and in the kitchen, it wasn't. 

You see the kitchen was not that in the 19th century, it was the center of everything and so we put the mother to work during World War II because we had to have her in industry and all of the sudden she discovered something interesting.  In this great shift that's taking place all of the sudden there's no place there in the kitchen really for her to flourish but she can flourish just as well in the marketplace.  She discovers that she can run the industries.  She can do anything out there that anybody else can do and that's what she wants to do.  She discovers she has loads of talents and capacities that can now be expressed in totally new ways.  They can't be expressed in the kitchen any longer, it doesn't count for much anymore.  You see what I'm talking about.

So now we have this dramatic shift in change of the woman but, immediately everything polarized.  What I heard in the fifties and sixties, now I was teaching in the college at the time, but what I heard coming out of the high schools was the constant demand by the teachers of their young women students.  "What's the matter with you, don't you want to make something of yourself?  Do you want to just stay home and have babies?"  As though that were the lowest single act they could do.  The failures, the drop-outs, the quitters would stay home and have babies.  What did that do the mothering instinct of the whole species?  It denigrated, put it as the lowest item of the whole social speed.  What's the answer to this whole thing?

When we get into the issue of day care you see.  So if she began to have children there was only day care, so she could go out and take care of her rightful place in society.  I've heard many young pregnant women sitting there at their office, their desk, say to me, as I come in we talk about her pregnancy and she says, "oh, yes I'm only going to have to be gone for two weeks and I'll be right back on the job, I'm not going to lose much time".  She's apologetic for the time she's going to take off to have her baby.  "Oh I'll be right back", as though she's abandoning her post, and so we have day care, and it's a bad situation.  It's a bad solution.  She's no longer the hub of that whole universe.  The answer is what is happening in so many other countries.  Let her simply take her infant with her.  That's what's happened throughout human history.  Never did the woman abandon whatever she was doing, she put the infant in a little sling and went right on with her work.  I was the last of 8 children, all born at home. 

My father was a newspaper man, he owned newspapers, and my mother didn't like to stay at home at all and we had hired help.  We couldn't have hired help, and my mother would come home, she'd have her baby, and all of us were born at home, but then she simply lugged us off to the newspaper office.  She liked to run my father's newspaper.  He was the editor but she kept him going and I cut my teeth on linotype.  I mean my world was the world of that newspaper and I loved every minute of it.  It was a fantastic place.  I had lots of other worlds, I had woods and streams and rivers and all that kind of thing too but I could be with my parents in their work day world and I wanted to be. 

With this young boy here, he was here all day yesterday, he's right here in the marketplace, he's right here at the scene of action you see and I certainly was too and my brothers and sisters were too.  That's one solution.  What we have to do is have industry simply provide for the care of the children, of the mothers so the mothers have continual access to those children as needed.  It would save the nation trillions of dollars.  We find that child under age 4 can take about two hours of separation from the mother and they love it but after that the old anxiety starts coming in.  So you've got about a two hour period at a time and then the mother needs to check in.  How easy it would be to have day care right there in any industrial or any office situation.  You have to incorporate that into the society rather than this terrible polarization and separation.  This striation of society, locking these kids up in a special place completely isolated from the rest of the society, it isn't working.  It isn't working now and it won't work. 

So the answer is not for women to have to do an either or thing if they don't want to.  If they elect to stay home and have children then we should give them every conceivable opportunity to.  IF they elect to work and have children we should make that work too and make it possible because we pay a dreadful price when we don't.  So these are some, I'm just thinking of some of the approaches that we can take to this but at base is the critical issue of the revival of the nurturing one, the mother, the matrix, the source from which everything in our species derives its energy and its strength and without that we're in trouble.  That's what my book is about.  That's what most of my books have been about.  That's why I concentrate on the mother rather than on the father.  I know that's a thorny issue, in fact I've received just really extremely excited letters of condemnation over that kind of a position but I thinks it's a strong position and I think I'm right on the factor of nurturing of our young as the critical issue.  And, nurturing of the male species.  They're a fragile species.  That intellect is here for a very special purpose, don't think it isn't, but you have to nurture it.  You have to take care of it or it will destroy itself.

Do you remember what Richard Wagner, that enormous genius of the 19th Century said, he said "he spotted Cosima", unfortunately this is the wife of Hans Von Bulow, but that didn't stop him for a minute, and he said "in that woman I saw that which would save me from myself", which was one of his great motifs running throughout all of his great dramas.  That the man sees in the woman that which will save him from himself and of course then the whole species is lifted up.

Beyond Adolescence

Dreaming an undeveloped intelligences
Joseph Chilton Pearce

My proposal is that there is this incredible intelligence, power, force, which we can say expresses itself in an evolutionary fashion which is always there to move on us, to wean us away from the lower structures into that highest of all structure.  And the reward system?  Here in this limbic structure.  Here in this emotional cognitive system and its direct connections with the heart.  So what evolution must do is wean us from seeking our rewards in all these intellectual plays with the physical system and show us that there are incredible awards even greater than that in this totally unknown open potential system, and then that is where evolution would achieve its greatest end. 

In studying some of the recent work of Jay Dackenbaugh and others in dream research there at the University of Virginia at Stanford University and up in Canada, suddenly it occurred to me that dreaming is one of our most undeveloped intelligences.  Simply waiting for developing.  Carl Jung laid out a magnificent plan of action towards starting to develop dreaming as an intelligent activity, and now it's really getting into full swing.   And some of the things you can do with that modality are awesome.  I haven't gotten into any of that today and I won't have a chance but you ought to look into what's going on in group dreaming, shared dreaming, lucid dreaming and so on.  Beginning to discover we can develop it rather than just use it.  And the same thing is certain of the frontal lobes.  What then do the frontal lobes have inherent within them? 

You want to know?  Nothing.  Nothing at all because they have inherent within them everything.  At a certain point everything is nothing.  That is they represent simply the total and complete unknown.  The unknown.  Now the interesting thing about the frontal lobes and the realm of potential which they have inherent within them is you find out what the possibilities of them are only by interaction or participation with them.  Only by an entry into that realm and then the unknown articulates or forms according to the nature of your entry into it so that you're constantly getting reflected back still, a knowing, which is a reflection of your own way of moving into the unknown.  I tried to get into that in the last two chapters of my book, "Evolutions End", it's a rather tricky subject.

I would refer you to Meister Eckhart, one of my certainly primary heroes of life, when he said, "to enter into that you must drop all known’s, everything known".  He said, "no name, no identification, no knowing can be carried into it whatsoever".  He called it "the cloud of unknowing".  Other people have written about "the cloud of unknowing".  What does it mean?  Well you're entering into darkness, you're entering into the unknown but it articulates this way, pure light or pure being as you enter into it.  So it's a purely participatory process and it's infinitely open and possible.  That is really the end of evolution.  Evolution's looking for a way to surpass itself in effect.  Evolution is looking for a way to move beyond its own physical process of evolution and we are it.  I think even the discovery of things like lasers and all that is simply, which never existed before, these are just little examples.  Evolution breaks through with this and enlightens the mind of the discovery and he writes it all down feverishly and it brings something totally new into the world, into the whole universe.  You don't find it anywhere else.  So that's what all that is part of this whole evolutionary scheme. 

Now, this is going to wind us up for this business of adolescence.  I would summarize it by saying, what we need in this new lexicon of the spirit is emphasis of the fact that there's no giving up of anything because we have nothing to give up.  That's ego on our part to think we have anything we can trade off with this evolutionary process, function, you can call it whatever you like.  As a result, there's no denial because when you start denying, you're saying there are parts of evolutionary process that should not be evolved.  See we carry it all with us.  We are the total evolutionary process, you find it all within us, that's what Maclean kept saying.  And, we carry it all with us, or none of it really.  So that's the other part of it is no denial, no trade-off, but instead the incorporation of the lower into the higher and that's something we can't ourselves do. 

So my proposal in my book is that there is this incredible intelligence, power, force, which we can say expresses itself in an evolutionary fashion which is always there to move on us to wean us away from the lower structures into that highest of all structure.  And the reward system, what do the biologists now say the reward system of the brain is?  Here in this limbic structure.  Here in this emotional cognitive system and its direct connections with the heart.  So what evolution must do is win us from seeking our rewards in all these intellectual plays with the physical system and show us that there are incredible awards even greater than that in this totally unknown open potential system, and then that is where evolution would achieve its greatest end.  The problems with that is of course establishing access to this open-ended field and learning to operate as simply a field within a field and all of that of course plunges us into some heavy philosophical kind of stuff we can think about.  The access to the field is done through models.  I don't know how you can do it without a model. 

You have to have the idea somewhere planted in your mind.  I think the reason for the appearance of semantic abstract language at age 11 is not just that we might understand physical or chemical terms and so on and so forth, but only through an abstract semantic language could we have presented to us the possibilities of an open-ended structure that has no content but creates content according to the nature of our entry into it.  So it never repeats itself and it's never the same from instant to instant but everything is always new.  It's a very exciting proposition.

Well what we want to talk about, I think of that marvelous question someone asked, it was such a heartfelt question, all this is just great, this is exciting and we hear a lot about this and it's kind of the new age, but what are we going to do specifically.  What can we do about the riots?  What do we do about the kids killing themselves and so on.

The first thing I would think of is in applying some of this would be to distinguish, and I've talked about this before, being responsible to the world and responsible for the world.  I'm responsible to the world.  Every action I make I have to make in response to the needs of my situation, the situation of the world I'm in.  But I'm not responsible for the world.  The minute I think I'm responsible for the world I will start and project out there all the business you see.  Really that's kind of playing God.  It gets us into some pretty tricky areas.  So we're not responsible for the world, we're responsible to the world. 

As a parent I was not responsible for my children, I was responsible to them.  I'll make it clearer.  There is a certain amount you can do for your children as a parent and believe me, if you're a parent you know this to be true, there comes a certain point where no more can you do.  And you just have to go along behind for a while and pick up the pieces of those kids and put them back together as best you can.  You've done all you can.  My teacher George Jaydar once said, "we've done all the damage to them we can do by the time they're 11 years old".  Well that might be true but nevertheless we are responsible to them, even when we are not responsible for them.

Beyond Adolescence

Something wonderful was about to happen
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Many of have had the feeling that something wonderful was about to happen, that life was full of promise and that we would play an important part in making the world a better place.  This passion and idealism blossoms during adolescence as we look at the world with completely new eyes.  In this program we are going stretch our limits by discovering completely new ways to look at our young adults. As with our other programs Joseph Chilton Pearce, will challenge us along with a group of parents, educators and health care providers, by asking that we consider that adolescence might actually be very different from what we think it is.  He suggests that adolescence may really be cumulative effect of both false education and a failure to fully develop our full potential.

Many of have had the feeling that something wonderful was about to happen, that life was full of promise and that we would play an important part in making the world a better place.  This passion and idealism blossoms during adolescence as we look at the world with completely new eyes.  In this program we are going stretch our limits by discovering completely new ways to look at our young adults. As with our other programs Joseph Chilton Pearce, will challenge us along with a group of parents, educators and health care providers, by asking that we consider that adolescence might actually be very different from what we think it is.  He suggests that adolescence may really be cumulative effect of both false education and a failure to fully develop our full potential. Please join Joe, along with a group of parents, educators and health care providers as they discover how the passionate search for ideals and ultimate models, which begins during adolescence, brings us to Evolution’s End, as we reach for the threshold of pure spirit.

Joe Pearce

Let's look at the adolescent as a real genuine group let’s say of the mid-teens or even the teens themselves.  As I said, adolescence is by in large an arbitrary category, creative of the now day and time for a group of people that have no place.  We have no room for them in the economic scheme of things and so we've created this category forum.  But, nevertheless there are some very genuine things about adolescence that I would like to take up today. 

Betty Staley of the Steiner School, the Waldorf School and the college in Fair Oaks, California, we've done many workshops together and she turned out a remarkable book called "Between Form and Freedom" which was a study of the adolescent, an English publication.  I've forgotten exactly the name of the publisher, this "Between Form and Freedom" little paperback has some marvelous insights.  There are three facets of the adolescent I would like to bring up that are not ordinarily mentioned about the adolescent.  You will find these, I'm sure, quite resonant with you.  The first of these characteristics of adolescence that we've already taken up starts around age 11 but by 15 or so it hits a kind of a critical acute level and that is idealism.  The average person looks at the adolescent and they say idealism, this is the craziest thing we ever heard.  They don't have an idealistic bone in their body.  Look at their models, and so on and so forth.

Now, the issue is, and it was Betty that made this so clear to me, they are so acutely painfully idealistic.  Starting about age 11, growing to about 14 or 15 and they start looking at the world through totally different eyes.  This was when all of the sudden our children start dropping behind us on the street.  They don't want to walk right with us.  Have you ever had that happen?  Here I know with all my young’uns, for years they looked up to me as though I were God and I liked that very much and suddenly they hit this certain age and they're looking at the old man and they're noticing he has dandruff, kind of bald, kind of small and not so much after all.  In schools, our little children marching beautifully, good morning teacher, and they're loving and obedient and so on and all of the sudden they hit this age and they're looking at the teacher and they say, what do you know, and they're challenging the teacher every minute.  The teacher's offended by this.  They're threatened by it.  What's going on?  Well it's just suddenly nothing of their own doings.  They're looking at the world through a prism, a new perspective and they're looking for a model that will match their idealism.  That's all they're doing.

And they're looking at us through this idealistic frame of reference which suddenly comes up and they find us falling short.  They weigh us and we are wanting, as the statement goes.  So we're offended by this but, understand that at this point they need a model that matches that idealism.  I ask you to quickly examine the models we give our young people. 

Just look at it.  Who are their models?  The pop starts, the rock stars, the movie stars, the sport stars, at best maybe the political stars, Donald Trump, really these are their models.  On every hand, and I say this in all kindness, on every hand, no one means to do this, the models betray what the young person is looking for.  They simply betray them.  They don't match up at all.  It's not what they're after.  It doesn't fit the need.  It's not appropriate and they keep looking.  And at a certain point, and it's happening earlier and earlier, at a certain point what happens?  In place of the idealism comes despair, a loss of hope of finding a model and cynicism, anger, frustration and the adoption of models who represent the exact opposite to what they're really after and that comes about from their feeling of futility and helplessness of ever finding what they really want. 

And so they kind of choose anti-heroes.  Instead of those who measure up to virtue, uprightness, all this that they felt at age 11, justice, fairness, and so on, they pick the punk star who says don't kill me I'm already dead.  That's what they wear on their t-shirts, don't kill me I'm already dead.  And that becomes the kind of cynical, and they all practice at this, they play it, they have to be tough, sophisticated and cynical of one another.  That is to deny their idealism.  Why must they deny it so vigorously?  What is it Macbeth said, "the lady doeth protest too much".  They deny it so vigorously because it's too painful.  Their loss of idealism is too painful to them so they pick their anti-models and of course the societies anxious to provide those for them because through those models you can make billions of dollars out of that frustration and rage of your young people.

Now, let's take the second thing about the adolescent.  This will start up somewhere probably around 14 or 15.  I can tell you by 16 it's so painful, it just is literally very heavy in a person's life.  And that's the feeling what I call the great expectation.  Great expectation.  And that is the feeling that something tremendous is supposed to happen and it's supposed to happen right now.  And instant by instant we wait for it as young people.  I was talking about this with a radio announcer once and he was one of these tough guys who battens around his guests you know and plays the tough role and I mentioned this business.  Can't you remember when you were an adolescent, this feeling something tremendous was supposed to happen in your life?  He said, "what do you mean remember it in my life", he says "I've waiting for it all my life and it hasn't happened yet" and blanky-blank "I don't think it ever will".  He said "I thought every corner I turned it was going to happen.  Every time I went up over a little hill it was going to happen and it never did".  I love that you see but that really speaks for us all.  This feeling of great expectation.  This constant anticipation that something is supposed to happen and we expect it right now. 

My favorite example, I have several, it was a letter from a young man in a university back east whose parents in New Mexico said he loved his third year of college.  He was a junior and he was a star in every way, he was an athletic and he was popular and he made top grades and how everything was going his way.  It was wonderful.  He loved his school more than ever but something happened that he had to try to share and there was no one to share it with except his parents.  He said, "I awakened the other night with 'the cold hand of terror clutching my heart'".  And he said, "what it was, I suddenly remembered that since I was 14 I'd been waiting constantly for something tremendous that was supposed to happen and I woke up in the middle of the night realizing that I was almost 21 and it had never happened yet and the thought occurred to me, suppose it never happens and I never even know what it was supposed to have been". 

The issue wasn't that he couldn't bear up under the disappointment of it never happening, the issue was he could not bear not knowing what it was supposed to have been.  This is the adolescent.  I think of George Leonard writing in Esquire Magazine, in his 16th year there in Atlanta, Georgia, he and his young friends getting together for their great bull sessions that would last all night long.  Maybe you can remember that and how they would exhaust all topics of women and sports car or racing and so on and so forth and finally get around to the terrifying subject of what this was.  There's also this gesture you see toward the heart, what it is and he spoke of this anguished longing, so intense we knew it could never be assuaged you see.  And the problem is, it can't even be articulated.  It can't be put into words.  All the young person can do is kind of futile gesture toward it and that's all.  This great anticipation of something tremendous that's supposed to happen.

Critical & Creative Thinking 02

Bring the house to order
Joseph Chilton Pearce

We are about ready to enter into society as functioning social members.  Nature provides for this. So, we look at a society's body of knowledge and it's around age 11 when the child is initiated into the culture's body of knowledge, and childhood begins to wind up and come to an end, and they make their preparations to become full members of the society. 

Now the child can deal with the structure of knowledge.  Why do you bring it to order?   You will see that in play, again, here, instead of the wide open play and make believe where everything changes all the time, very fluid, very relaxed, a lot of fun, the young person becomes very much involved in rigid rules and regulations. I talked about how out on the sandlot we spend half our time arguing.  You are not being fair. I was out, you were not, and so on and so forth, hammering out our giving up of this absolute freedom we had on behalf of a social group and how a social group organizes and manages to get along together.

We are preparing for what now?  Well, we have got about three, four years before puberty, before the opening of genital sexuality when we can actually father children.  Can you think of anything on earth that requires more self-restraint than parenting.  Self-restraint, self-sacrifice, giving up one's own entirely self-centered good on behalf of the good of another.  That’s parenting.  And to prepare for that, what do we have?  We bring the house to order.  And the person undergoes willful self-restraint on behalf of the rules and regulations of a larger order.    

We find that we are about ready to enter into society, the mainstream of society as functioning social members.  Nature provides for this, the fact that we now have created an intermediary state, which we call adolescence, which really never existed before.  You were a child up to a certain point, you underwent certain rights of passage, and you took your place in the adult world, for which all your childhood had prepared you.  Now, we have adolescence, and we start speaking of the teenager's adolescence.  And adolescence has grown this way, moving deeper and deeper into childhood, children become adolescents earlier and earlier, and they stay adolescents longer and longer and longer.  Now, they are even living with their parents until they are 30 and so on and so forth.  So, adolescence is kind of an arbitrary dumping ground for people we are not ready for, we have no place for them in our society.  But nature still is preparing for that socialization and parenting at this point.   

So, we look at a society's body of knowledge.  What is a society's body of knowledge?  You won’t find any society on earth, the Aborigine, the Eskimo Laplanders, whatever it might be, the South American tribes, all of those people have a body of knowledge, and it's around age 11 when the child is initiated into the culture's body of knowledge, and childhood begins to wind up and come to an end, and they make their preparations to become full members of the society.  

All bodies of knowledge that all societies have, following the same three categories, it's real interesting.  And they, again, follow, and here I'm fitting everything into my pattern, like Freudians fitting everything into the Id, Ego, and Superego.  By the way, they followed the same pattern too.  But it does fit this triune nature of the brain.

All societies have a body of knowledge which consists of three things.  The first will deal with the physical world, the actual mechanics of the physical world.  In our society that ends up as science and technology and perhaps certain crafts.  Science, technology, agriculture, all these practical technologies for dealing with the physical world.  You don't find any society on earth which will not have a body of knowledge inherited, passed down through the ages for dealing with the physical world in the most economical fashion and for the wellbeing of all.  And then, now that's, of course, dealing with the reptilian system, our primary world, physical body system.     

And then, the body of knowledge's second category will always be art.  Now art, in its broadest possible category, covering every facet of art, art is simply the language of the emotional cognitive system.  It's the language of relationship.  It's the language of feeling, of that deepest core of being me as distinct from everything else, and my experience of being me, distinct from everything else, and how I relate to the whole life experience.  Art is that language of the *limbic system, the language of the emotional cognitive system.  And if you think about it, you will see how perfectly that is true.    

I remember David Bohm, the great physicist late departed, saying, music was pure, subtle energy.  Subtle energy.  He said, music was the subtle world, in effect, expressing itself in the physical world, and I really think that's quite true.  When we look at the art forms of other nations, other peoples, the Australian Aborigine art form is astonishing.  All of these, we find expressions of the feeling capacity, the affective expression of life.     

And then finally, the third stage, moving on up, what do we have?  The realm of meaning.   Meaning in its purest abstract form.  Meaning.  Well, we stand back, we look at all this objectively and we say, what the dickens is it all about?  Meaning.  And this will always express itself as our philosophies and our religions.  Philosophies and/or, whatever you want to call it, and/or religions.  And around about age 11, a child simply, spontaneously becomes religious in some fashion.  And generally, they want to become religious in a very organized, formal way.   And they will immediately polarize things.  This is a great age of polarization.  We don’t understand this.  Great age of polarization.  It's either right or it's wrong.  And let's be perfectly clear about it, it's either just or it's unjust, it's righteous or it's unrighteous, you are  either fair or you're not being fair, etc.  The child sees everything in these clear blacks and whites.  They are a perfect example of the old classical, logical truth tables, either A or not A, and you can't have it both ways.  That's this age, beautifully.

And this need, this critical need of philosophical, religious basis of meaning that's applicable to this age, that's a serious need.  My friend Gene *Swartz, who's with the Waldorf School in Spring Valley, teaches sixth grade.  He said, we talk about God because children seriously need the subject of God at that period, you see.  And of course in this day and age, this is politically incorrect and not only that, it's illegal.  But that's a private school system, so we relax.    

Now, this need of a religious frame of reference or philosophical frame of reference, it's really all kind of the same thing, is simply the need for meaning.  David Bohm said, the brain really operates and functions by meaning.  It can't operate in a vacuum that is meaningless to it.  We were speaking a while ago, someone came up and said, I've been called attentional, I have an attention deficit.

My daughter is seriously deficit on attention unless she likes the subject.   And can she entrain then, you see.  So, we get to this period and meaning becomes critically important to the child.  And that's the expression of this third and highest structure of the mind, when it reflects back  on the whole process and, look, it's reflecting back on its, always its physical process.  It's now, what is the philosophy for meaning in this physical world at this time.  We need a meaning for it.  That's our religious impulse at that time, a meaning for this physical life.  It's still directed toward this.  The whole first 15 years is all directed toward what?  Stabilizing our dominion over our physical world, gaining it and stabilizing it.   

So, if we look at this from this standpoint, we will find that to make our focal point of the highest part of education, the production of scientific, technological minds, and geniuses in a system which, above all, must, of necessity apparently to maintain its own integrity, deny meaning.  Deny meaning.  Then, we are going to have some difficulties.  We are going to have some difficulties.

How Can So Many Deny So Much?

Over fifty years ago James W. Prescott, PhD, noted that an absence of what we call bonding is neglect or abuse. Researchers at the McLean Hospital identified four types of permanent brain abnormalities caused by early childhood abuse and neglect. These and other studies confirm what Prescott and associates discovered in the 1960's and 1970's; that lack of affectionate, intimate contact between mothers and infants during the most sensitive periods of brain growth may result in permanent brain abnormalities associated with juvenal and adult patterns of depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, aggression and violence.

Themes: 
abuse-neglect
bonding
culture
wellness

Failure of Culture—James. W. Prescott

 VIOLENCE: THE Failure of Culture

James W. Prescott, Ph.D.

The failure of Women to become Nurturing Mothers is the failure of Culture. One cannot Nurture or Love if they have not been nurtured or loved. One cannot give to someone else what he or she does not possess. Nurturing and Love are learned behaviors not to be found in our genes. There are no genes for love or violence—they are learned behaviors. This learning process begins with MOTHER in the intimacy of breastfeeding bonding, which contains all the elements of nurturing and love—from the micro molecular biochemistry of breast milk to the macro chemistry of the sensory environment of touch, movement, taste, and smell of the body of MOTHER-- all that is crucial for the development of the bran gestalt called LOVE where the Whole is greater than the sum of its Parts.

Themes: 
bonding
culture

Essential Joseph Chilton Pearce 60

Losing Sensory Perception
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Out of Germany come the studies that show how increased environmental stimulation causes the brain to close, to narrow its perception filters at a rate of approximately 1% per years. Over a ten year period the brain will register 10% less nuance of color, sound, taste, etc., thus requiring media producers to increase the pace, volume, explosive violence, the overall level of stimulation, which in turn, causes the brain to further limit and constrict actual sensory perception and sensitivity. The brains of our grandparents literally perceive a vastly different spectrum of sensations than today’s developing brain.

Essential Joseph Chilton Pearce 34

Self as Image
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Neuroscientist speak of a primary self, and then the emergence of an autobiographical self. Autobiographical implies separate from, distinct which comes about during the toddler period and language development. The toddler rushing out to explore with wonder hitting negativity over and over and forming an semantic image that conform or mirrors that negativity. And that image is called the autobiographical self. The autobiographical self is always negative. In the original open state there is no need for an image of self of any kind. Through this negative image the child feels it can maintaining contact with the source, parents and family, projecting this negativity. Praise therefore is a counterfeit form of negativity.

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