Religion and science as field effects

Religion and science as field effects
Joseph Chilton Pearce

There it is. It’s a very demonic process.  Of course then we get into the whole medical travesty of the taking over of childbirth and shifting millions of years of genetic encoding and the fact that that is sweeping the world, practices which are bizarre such as medical interference at childbirth, C-sectioning, the fact that that should become a major occupation, the way of bringing children into the world and we see 80% C-sectioning and Thailand, having wrecked Thailand as a nation and no one would believe that. If you say that, oh no, there are all these other failures that we’ve made. And then now the report I just got in of the fact that the Chinese had adopted C-sectioning and you got to wondering why? That’s what I would call field effect. These fields of notions get going and they’re contagious. They spread and they leave destruction in their wake.

A field in this sense is an aggregate or a way by which thought forms or practices or beliefs in the human tend to aggregate and intensify and grow in their power and attract followers. And every follower they attract, a field attracts, the follower intensifies and strengthens the field. We have the field of medicine. Now, what’s wrong with the field of medicine? We have all these other fields we speak of. He’s going into the field of Architecture, the field of Mathematics, and so on and so forth. Each one of these field effects takes on a life of its own. When Darwin said any, and I do follow Darwin, I think he’s one of the most ignored geniuses of history practically, he said “any activity repeated long enough becomes habitual,” it becomes a habit and “any habit repeated long enough will tend to become genetic,” locked into the very gene structure. And we don’t believe that and yet you look at the, well there are lots and lots of examples of it on every hand. I’m using field effect in the same fashion. Systems of belief or practices or new concepts and ideas that you’ll find grow and grow and grow and become more and more popular, attract more and more people and the more people that are attracted the stronger its field becomes. Right now if you look into our local telephone directories you will find the lawyers filling chapters of the telephone directory and other fields dropping out entirely. And so what’s happened there? That law and the practice of law should become one of the biggest field effects in the United States and so on it goes. And these fields take on tremendous power.

We look at the concept of who we are that grows and takes over in human society. The image in America of the true male growing more and more violent and the way this whole concept, for instance, took over and eliminated child play on behalf of organized sports and so forth. The little small things like that we we’ve been paying our attention and yet is bringing about remarkable changes in the neural structure of the brain, the body and its operations and all and it spreads. We think of the way the peak of this business of male domination and taking over all the way down to child play, the organizing of sports in children always with the coach behind it and the coach setting the model and example who the children try to be. It was in the late sixties they did a survey of high school students of what qualified a person for real manliness and the answer or one of the major definitions given of real manliness was the willingness and ability to inflict pain or harm on another without remorse or without feeling. And we find that that’s the case and violence has risen and risen and risen because violence itself becomes a field effect. And the only way to protect ourselves in that field is to violence itself and people don’t pay any attention to all of that. Well this is human nature but it was not human nature previously.

Religion and science as demonic forces

Religion and science as demonic forces

That was very clear to me that early religion was one of our great enemies and our downfall, not only looking at the present time when we have nothing but this worldwide clash between religious beliefs and where even the Buddhist’s get violent at times. Throughout the whole planet, the rising tide of violence seemed to have, more often than not, a religious fervor involved in it, not just the Christians and the Jews and the Muslims, but it seemed kind of spread throughout the world. The strange phenomenon of terrorism as a practice and the Jihad, and yet we look back in the early Christians, singing on their way to feed the lions and so on and so forth. They’re feeling, getting on the crusades and going over to kill the Arabs and so on, just bloodshed after bloodshed, and then the backlash. The Muslims might have been perfectly at peace had we not, the Christians, invaded them to take their land away from them and so on and so forth.  So, it’s been a back and forth bloodshed and beneath it a supposedly very generous gesture of the powers that be, of these religious people whose aim is to lift us to a higher level. And we have really plunged deeper and deeper into despair. That’s all.

That was very clear to me that early religion was one of our great enemies and our downfall, not only looking at the present time when we have nothing but this worldwide clash between religious beliefs and where even the Buddhist’s get violent at times. Throughout the whole planet, the rising tide of violence seemed to have, more often than not, a religious fervor involved in it, not just the Christians and the Jews and the Muslims, but it seemed kind of spread throughout the world. The strange phenomenon of terrorism as a practice and the Jihad, and yet we look back in the early Christians, singing on their way to feed the lions and so on and so forth. They’re feeling, getting on the crusades and going over to kill the Arabs and so on, just bloodshed after bloodshed, and then the backlash. The Muslims might have been perfectly at peace had we not, the Christians, invaded them to take their land away from them and so on and so forth.  So, it’s been a back and forth bloodshed and beneath it a supposedly very generous gesture of the powers that be, of these religious people whose aim is to lift us to a higher level. And we have really plunged deeper and deeper into despair. That’s all.

And I blame that then on religion which is pretty narrow.  But on the other hand I think even of science. I don’t think science has been at all the great saving grace as a human species as we have made it to be. We look at the enormous problems which we face today and everyone is convinced that science has literally lifted us out of the gutter and led us into green fields. On the other hand, if you look at it at the basis of nearly every real catastrophe certainly facing us today it’s scientific. And to most people this is an even worse heresy than would be spiting on the flag or calling your mother by a bad name, to suggest that science has been a curse on the species. It just doesn’t make any sense to people at all. And yet if you look closely you’ll find these two things; science as a new religion and religion itself is what brought us to the brink of species extinction.

I would look also at such a harmless little thing as Goethe’s Sorcerer’s Apprentice, which was a perfect picture of what has happened in the scientific world.  And Goethe, being a great scientist of his time, wrote it as a warning. To him he was saying look what you’re doing. You think the boss is away and you can catch the secrets of this thing and run the show and you’ll lead through your destruction so doing. And it was interesting that every one of these new discoveries which will spawn more and more and more of the same and they’ll all prove in the end to be destructive. And so, to say that science is a destructive thing in our life is an even worse heresy to the average citizen, even to the learned people, the educated people. To them this just makes no sense at all.  It’s an insane kind of an irrational remark and yet if you look at it closely, at the root of our problems today lay science and religion.

Rebirth of Spirit

Author: 
Joseph Chilton Pearce

Religion was one of our great enemies and our downfall, not only looking at the present time but throughout history. The rising tide of violence seemed to have, more often than not, a religious fervor involved in it. On the other hand I think of science. I don’t think science has been at all the great saving grace as a human species as we have made it to be. If you look at it at the basis of nearly every real catastrophe certainly facing us today it’s scientific.

4 Greedy self or common self

The Greedy Self or The Common Self
Darcia Narvaez

If you are raised with that much experience in the natural world, without much experience in inter-subjectivity and resonance and attunement with others, which we’re doing to kids today, you’re going to have a sense that either you’ll be in that self-protective mode of the way the world works is for me to be dominate or I have to submit.  Dominance is better usually but some people prefer submission.  And so you’re going to have an attitude that you can’t survive or you can’t be well-off, you can’t feel safe unless you’re in control.  So you’re going to want to control others as much as possible and make sure everything is left brain ordered.  You don’t have much of a right hemisphere of self-regulation.  You regulate yourself with things.  You horde stuff.  You accumulate lots of money.  Whatever it is, something out there has to make you feel okay.  So you don’t have an inner sense of balance so that you get easily thrown off tract if things aren’t following your script. 

I’ll start with the indigenous perspective, the hunter-gatherer perspective is described by the anthropologists.  They have a common self-view.  Common self meaning that tree, that mountain, that river is part of me and the insects, the animals, and it’s part of their view we’re all in this together and it’s a cycle of life, essentially, that there death in transformation.  A new life and it just goes on and on.   There’s no place to go.  We’re just here.  And so there’s no afterlife.  There’s no thought of afterlife.  We’re just here as part of the cycle.

One thing that’s important to say for the hunter-gatherers is that they’re living in nature and they have a sense of living with nature, that it’s part of them.  They are part of it.  And that’s quite different from the Western view that some say emerged from the Middle East, maybe 2,000, some 5,000 years ago.  It depends.  Where it’s us against nature.  The humans are not part of nature.  They need to fight it and control it and dominate it.  And so, if you are raised without that much experience in the natural world, without much experience in inter-subjectivity and resonance and attunement with others, which we’re doing to kids today, you’re going to have a sense that either you’ll be in that self-protective mode of the way the world works is for me to be dominate or I have to submit.  Dominance is better usually but some people prefer submission.  And so you’re going to have an attitude that you can’t survive or you can’t be well-off, you can’t feel safe unless you’re in control.  So you’re going to want to control others as much as possible and make sure everything is left brain ordered.  You don’t have much of a right hemisphere of self-regulation.  You regulate yourself with things.  You hoard stuff.  You accumulate lots of money.  Whatever it is, something out there has to make you feel okay.  So you don’t have an inner sense of balance so that you get easily thrown off track if things aren’t following your script. 

So the Common Self-world-view expands the self.  You have a big inclusive self and hopefully you have the smaller ego which is what you find in the hunter-gatherer societies.  In Western cultures we have to grow a big ego to protect ourselves.  We don’t feel safe and we don’t feel part of the world.  We don’t feel part of our community.  So you have a big ego and a very small self.  So the big Common Self though is an alternative which I think actually is a very hopeful one because in this view we’re all in a process of being and transforming and dying and living and so on.  And so right now everything looks pretty dire for the planet if you look at all the data.  But it’s us.  This is us.  And there’s hope because if we can shift our imaginations back to our human essence, we can transform ourselves again.  We’ve done inadvertent transformation.  We’ve done huge experiments on ourselves.  And maybe it’s great to have a lot of autistic people who think, you know, very unrelationally about stuff.  It remains to be seen.  But actually at the same time we’re destroying the planet.  All these things we don’t think are important, rivers and creatures and species and forests and on and on.  So what I see is the Common Self.  When I get depressed about the way things are, I remember, this is US.  We’re not going anywhere.  We’re just going to transform and come back in some fashion. That, actually it’s alright then, we’ll come back.  Maybe we’re not going to save ourselves now but maybe when I come back as a mouse, things will be better.  I don’t know.

3 Intelligent without disassociating

Being intelligent without disassociating
Darcia Narvaez

I think what happens when you don’t know what you’re doing as a novice, or you’ve been undermined in your development, is that you need some other outside structure to tell you how to live.  So in the hunter-gatherer communities, the Native American traditions the whole life’s field is structured around development and helping that child become the contributing adult. Colin Turnbull in his book, “The Human Cycle,” talks about how the Imbuti in comparison to his own British upbringing just develop their children or offer their children so much more. 

There’s a way to be intelligent where you’re not disassociating but when you go into the left hemisphere kind of thinking where you want to categorize everything, you want to structurally control it and count it.  That’s a disassociation from relationship.  So you have decided that that other thing there is a “thing,” it’s an object, and you are powerful over it as a subject.  So that’s what I’m talking about.  It’s the breaking of relational responsibility to whatever it is you’re talking about.  We can see this in economics, in the theory of economics.  It’s decided you have no responsibility to anybody but yourself because you’re a selfish creature anyway right?  So who cares about anything else?  It’s just irrational to care about  the relationships with other people in your family and your responsibility to the Earth.  That’s all externalized.  You know, that kind of thing.  It’s disassociation from relational responsibility. 

Well, I think what happens when you don’t know what you’re doing as a novice, or you’ve been undermined in your development, is that you need some other outside structure to tell you how to live.  So in the hunter-gatherer communities, the Native American traditions, you structure, the whole life’s field is structured around development and helping that child become the contributing adult.  Colin Turnbull in his book, “The Human Cycle,” talks about how the Mbuti in comparison to his own British upbringing just develop their children or offer their children so much more.  He was raised by nannys.  He went to boarding school and he says that he felt by the time he got to adolescence he had nothing in him because nobody tried to encourage his own emotional development or his sensory development.  Instead it was all suppression and punishment.  And then when he got to middle school and high school he was suppose to be aggressive and be a key member and fight, fight, fight and all that.  And he felt like well yeah, what else is there to do?  But in contrast Mbuti are very supportive and loving towards their children and encourage their sensory development and every experience is encouraged.  But of course they’re in a different environment. 

And then by the time they get to adolescence they feel energized and ready and open to tackle whatever obstacles or whatever challenges adolescents and what that could bring.  It’s a very different orientation.  So if you arrive at adolescence or even before that as Turnbull did, with nothing in you, you’ve got to find something out there then.  So that’s where ideology steps in and it can be religious ideology.  It can be science.  So science also is an ideology.  It can be used that way.  Because science is again that detachment from relationship.  I’m going to treat this animal, like experimental medicine. This upsets me so it is difficult for me to say. But it’s experimenting on live animals and people started to just cut vocal cords so they wouldn’t hear the screeching of the animal.  How in the world can you go to that place and act that way unless you’re detached, disassociated and you have something missing in your heart?  So it’s the heart sense that is so key to being a human being and that’s what we’re really undermining, the way we’re raising kids.

2 Multiple types of morality

Multiple types of morality
Darcia Narvaez

What happens I think in the rest of society now is that we raise children without what they need and so they’re easily stressed and going into the self-protective mode.  We put them in schools though and we tell them you need to know this information and if they can survive there and do well, they develop sort of a detached imagination.  We say don’t feel. We put them in rooms where we don’t want them to feel, don’t want them to sense their body’s because they’re just sitting a chair, so they learn to disassociate in this way of intellect, what we call intellect, and that then becomes dominant.  So I think adults who succeed in our culture these days of shifting between the self-protective mode and then this detached imagination or if they’re self-protected and imaginative they’ll be vicious.  They’ll want to impose their will on someone else by their only ideology or even if they think like a Missionary or others we’re going to help those people over there.  Those poor Africans you know, they need my help and I’m going to go in and impose my view of what’s good on them. 

We have to understand that there’s multiple types of morality and if you’re mistreated a child and you’re let cry, your stress response systems, the various kinds, are going to be much more threat reactive and when you’re in social situations you’re going to go into a self-protective mode which either means you’re going to want to be dominate or you’re going to withdraw, depending on how you sense things in that moment.  In that case, that’s morality but is a very self-protective and it’s an abnormal kind of a morality for human nature, is my point.  But we think it’s normal now because it’s all over the place.  And then the other option is to disassociate.

I use Paul McClain’s “Triune Brain Theory” as an inspiration. I know people complain about it although the critiques weren’t that bad.  It was just minor details but people somehow dismiss it in the neuroscience field which, unfortunately.  But anyway offers a nice view into the different modes that we have so that the very self-protective mode is that all those more primitive survival systems activating and kind of drawing the blood flow away from other options and your thinking just deteriorates in those situations.  It’s all about self-protection.  And then we have the mammalian and limbic system area, the very pro-social kind of socially oriented part of the brain that must have good early supportive experience to develop well.  You know this from various researchers like Allan Schore’s work.  The third area is the imaginative aspect so that’s the prefrontal cortex, the neo-cortex, the ability to imagine alternatives to the present moment, to have some foresight about the future and imagine possibility.  That part also develops but it also requires, to develop well, a good supportive environment, not only in early life but through age 30 or so, or even probably beyond because we can all shift back into this, what’s called sometimes, the reptilian mode of self-protection. 

What happens I think in the rest of society now is that we raise children without what they need and so they’re easily stressed and going into the self-protective mode.  We put them in schools though and we tell them you need to know this information and if they can survive there and do well, they develop sort of a detached imagination.  We say “don’t feel.” We put them in rooms where we don’t want them to feel, don’t want them to sense their bodies because they’re just sitting in a chair, so they learn to disassociate in this way of intellect, what we call intellect, and that then becomes dominant.  So I think adults who succeed in our culture these days shift between the self-protective mode and then this detached imagination, or, if they’re self-protected and imaginative they’ll be vicious--they’ll want to impose their will on someone else by their only ideology, or even if they think like a missionary, or others, “we’re going to help those people ‘over there’.”  Those poor Africans you know, they need my help and I’m going to go in and impose my view of what’s good on them.  And I think that’s a vicious thing to do.  It’s disrespectful.

So that’s sort of where we are.  We flip between those modes.  But what a hunter-gather society shows us is that there’s an alternative way to be and it’s quite different.  Its being present in the moment with others and then using your imagination to imagine yourself connected to everything in the universe, everything on Earth is part of your relational context. You are in a web of relationships.  And we know that’s true from physics depending on which element of science you’re looking at.  We share DNA with all these creatures and plants.  We are connected.  The hunter-gather spends most of their time in this mode of being, being connected and present and they’re very ‘there,’ and they’re not imposing themselves on others and they have just a different kind of morality.

So that’s what I would take as a baseline for human nature.  That we are meant to be imaginative, in the globe, in the planet, with the plants and animals and we can see from Native Americans that they include the mountain, the air, the water, the river as a self. It’s an agent. They are agents. What happens when we deteriorate the early life experience of children we undermine their ability here to hear the mountain, the tree, the wind, understand them as agents. 

Humans aren’t the only agents.  Human are not the only ones that communicate.  All these other entities do as well.  The hunter-gatherers, the Native Americans especially, have a sense that they are agents and they are responsible to be in relationship, respectful of the relationship, with all those other entities.  So that’s another aspect that we’re missing now that’s led to the demise of our understanding of the Earth and how we are now destroying our habitat.

Darcia Narvaez, PhD Neurobiology and Morality

Author: 
Darcia Narvaez

Neurobiology in the Development of Human Morality, Evolution, Culture and Wisdom is about trying to shift our imagination to remind us that our human nature is different from what we see today and the way we raise children can be different also and they’re linked to what we think is human nature and what we think of as normal human adult behavior is not normal.  We are very abnormal.  But unfortunately the people who are abnormal are the ones that are spreading their view of the world all over the world as if that’s normal, to be selfish and always thinking about what you can gain for yours

NICHD: REINVENTING THE WHEEL

James W. Prescott, Ph.D.

THOSE WHO CANNOT REMEMBER THE PAST ARE CONDEMNED TO REPEAT IT

George Santayana The Life of Reason (1905) 

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

ON 30 MARCH 2015, the NICHD provided a public press release that described an intervention to teach mothers of preterm infants how to interact with their babies more effectively, which resulted in better weight gain and growth for the infants, a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health.

Maternal interaction improves growth, weight gain in preemies

Themes: 
sensory deprivation
culture

The Only Power Strong Enough

 

Carly Elizabeth is seven months young today, just this week beginning to pre-crawl. I wish I could be so attentive, persistent, focused, so sensitive and aware of everything instead of being preoccupied with all my stuff. Carly craves engagement and it is truly one of the most challenging tasks as a parent to keep up, to stay in the present moment, to share this experience together right now. Oh, how easy it is to give that demand for complete engagement over to some mechanical or technological thing, but at what price?

Themes: 
attachment
bonding
culture

Michel Odent, MD

Author: 
Michele Odent

Michel Odent describes how changes in birth practices are altering individual human beings, the cultures they create and implicitly the future of the species.

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