What We Crave The Most

We try to avoid it but it happens anyway. I knew within a few hours that our colleague brought home more than sales leads from a recent trade show. She, a ‘wipe everything possible’ gal, was crawling with invisible micro-beasts and didn’t know it, one of more than 300 viruses that cause the common cold and flu. Falling to sleep I could only wonder how hard I would be hit.

Waking the next morning I got my answer; fever, chills, body aches, that familiar congestion in the chest soon to blossom into ‘the hack.’ Most painful was my need to reject Carly when she reached up. I tried to hide but she knows everything. Where could I go? Z and Carly seemed fine but I slept in the playroom anyway.

Themes: 
wellness

Now Means Now!

Conflict with a young child is really crazy and yet, it happens all the time. We adults have forgotten how immense feelings can be. Imagine that every day is Christmas Eve, Santa is coming, and being told no, we have to sweep the floor or put on our shoes first. For Carly now is all there is. At times her frustration with us is bursting. When we say, “it is time to go,” that means NOW, not after we answer a few texts, dump the trash and pack the car. Luckily, at eighteen months (and a few days) the next moment will be Christmas too.

Themes: 
avoiding conflect

Who Are We Really?

Joseph Chilton Pearce is an original. His life quest - to understand our Amazing Capacities and Self-Inflicted Limitations - broke new ground. His personal experience, what he called Cracks in the Cosmic Egg, demonstrates that what we call reality is relative. By understanding and appreciating what forms our self-world-view, what we perceive as reality, we open the doors of perception to wider and wider views, and what we call reality responds. Miracles are miracles to those who don’t know who and what they really are. As was said two millennia ago, ‘greater things than this shall yee do.’ Indeed, but not while tethered to a post.

Melting Hugs

Today Carly Elizabeth it officially eighteen months young. Yes, the brain grows more the first year than any other time. The density of possible connections are two to three times that of an adult. What does that mean? Muffins on the floor, toy train wrecks, hidden objects to trip over in the dark, toilet paper strolling down the hall, my wallet in the trash, car keys in the vacuum and a million other surprises.

Themes: 
bonding
brain development
unconditional love

Celebrating Joseph Chilton Pearce

“The whole is always found within any of its parts. I am both this individual, isolated, sniveling, scared little part and at the same time I’m also the whole. It’s impossible not to be.” Joe frames the human intellect as representing the separate, autobiographical individual and the intelligence of the heart as the representation or expression of the universal, transpersonal whole. “The heart [intelligence] is both me and the totality. I am that but as part relating to whole from here. From the heart I’m that as the whole relating to the individual part up here [referring to intellect], still that reciprocal interaction. That, to me, takes my breath away.” In this sequence Joe also explores what science calls the ‘field affect.’ In the same way our personal thoughts affect the body, the intelligence of the heart accesses and expresses universal fields.

Themes: 
fields of intelligence

Celebrating Joseph Chilton Pearce

As we continue Joe develops a number of themes all centering on the long term consequences of not being nurtured. ‘The child who is nurtured and bonded and given that safe space from the earliest developmental period can move away from the safe space carrying that same state of mind with him and is ready to move on into the higher realms of human possibility.  Whereas the majority of us lacking that safe space never move on. We try to repair or build for ourselves the safe space to be.  It’s a safe space that we either carry with us and are - or not at all, yet we are trained to believe we can create the safe space by following all the appropriate cultural directives and every cultural directive drives us into an ever increasing unsafe positions and we feel more and more threatened by the world.’ Here again, Joe turns our cultural assumptions upside down. Rather than culture being the sanctuary it pretends to be, culture is the source of our greatest trauma and pain.

Michael Mendizza

Themes: 
male vulnerability
culture

Celebrating Josephh Chilton Pearce

Continuing to focus on the way culture shapes our reality Joe notes: ‘One of the things that culture brings about is the idea that without its guiding filters we would be like beasts in the forest, savage, uncivilized, murderous, etc. The truth of the matter is, culture is what makes us savage, vicious, murderous, war after war after war because of the restrictions and restraints imposed by culture. Both neural scientist James Neal and Alan Shore question: “Will we survive the current situation?” And both Neal and Shore, said “Only if we can produce males capable of nurturing their offspring.” And this sets the stage for a radically different view of the nurturing role of males.

Michael Mendizza

Themes: 
culture
violence
male vulnerability

Celebrating Joseph Chilton Pearce

One of the most deeply penetrating insights that emerge from Joe’s vision of imagination is how it manifests as both our individual self-image or ego and the culture we live in. One is a personalized micro view and the other a collective macro view of essentially the same field, each giving rise to the other. The Greek word persona comes to mind, persona being the cultural mask our authentic nature wears. We must conform to culture to belong and therefore survive and by doing so we limit and constrain our true nature and potential. Here rests another pillar in Joe’s overarching framework.

Michael Mendizza  

Themes: 
culture
identity

Celebrating Joseph Chilton Pearce

In Joe’s world true imagination is causal, meaning creative. We can literally enter into the ontological structure of reality itself (ontological meaning the branch of metaphysics that studies the nature of existence or being), and we learn to do this first with storytelling and imaginative play, but that is just the beginning. The very top of Tibetan meditation practices develops this capacity. The child will maintain that great capacity for imagination if it’s encouraged. If it’s discouraged there’s no payoff. Fear of being rejected replaces true development of this extremely high and powerful capacity. This concept is one of the great pillars of Joe’s collected writings.

Michael Mendizza

Themes: 
imagination

No! It Is Not Easy

Love transforms effort and attention into near constant nurturing, and nurturing is a transformative practice. Years ago Joseph Chilton Pearce described how all learning in the early years involves movement and, at seventeen months, Carly Elizabeth is in near perpetual motion. She never stops! She weighs twenty-two pounds and I, a strapping one-hundred and seventy. You would think I could keep up. Not a chance. It takes a village.

Themes: 
parenting
trust
respect

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