Mass Education and Mass Media Do The Same Thing, But Differently

Speaking with a colleague whose husband had, what we plebeians (commoners) would call, an aristocratic title, noted, “He was bred to believe he was superior.” From his perspective what we might call arrogant is simply how reality is. When one’s republic dumbs-down into an Oligarchy, as former President Jimmy Carter describes has taken place in the United States, all the underlying assumptions regarding democracy, the rules and morality that govern society we are taught in school are off. We are witnessing what Chris Hedges, John Taylor gatto and Noam Chomsky call class warfare, a very old story indeed.

Themes: 
democracy
media
education

The Number One On-Line Anything for Children Age Two... What?

It breaks my heart to see the propaganda. The Number One On-Line Anything for Children Age Two complete with college cap and diploma. This happy, smiling fake mouse magically appeared signing off from Facebook. How many hits; 892,469 likes and 50,017 talking about? How many young parents have been lured by the Hurried Child, Baby Einstein, early is better, screen time is educational, get junior off to a good, NO the best possible start, to keep up with the neighbors and the dumb-down standards, competing for that coveted position at the XYZ Preschool hoping she will make the cut.

Themes: 
brain
education
media

Dumb is Good - Dumber is Better

“TV and compulsory schooling do the same thing but differently…” John Taylor Gatto

Bored, reparative, rote, uncritical, uncreative, unimaginative, easily influenced, subservient to authority, behavior modification and obedience trained… the perfect consumer. Herd mentality is the goal of both.

'Form is Content' and when conditioning is the goal content and standards are a hoax, a distraction to hide from view the deeper conditioning agenda. This is no secret. It is in plain view, but he conditioning is so good that few have the capacity, attention or ability to question how the system operates.

Themes: 
culture
education
freedom
intelligence
media

Standardized Skooling

lynn stodard education

Lynn has been working with a group of committed educators to get the standardized monkey off our kid's backs.

Also see https://ttfuture.org/whats-new/events/featured_interview

How to Increase Graduation Rates
Lynn Stoddard

If School District Superintendents want to increase graduation rates, they should not tighten the screws on teachers to standardize students. A recent study found that teacher’s job satisfaction is at an all-time low. Nearly a third of new teachers say they are very, or fairly likely, to leave the profession. This confirms my perception that teacher morale has never been lower than it is now. I lay the blame on federal government intrusion into education, which the 10th amendment says is a state responsibility. Ever since the “Nation at Risk Report” in 1983, the U.S. Office of Education has applied several “reforms” all based on the idea that it is possible to make students alike in knowledge and skills – and that teachers should try harder to do. Standardized achievement tests are used as a whip to make sure all students know and can do the same things at grade-level check points.

No wonder teachers are demoralized! They know they can’t standardize students like cars or washing machines! The Common Core State Standards are the latest attempt to sell the idea of standardization to teachers and the general public. It is setting teachers and students up for failure on a grand scale. There will be an increase in good teachers leaving the profession, more students dropping out and fewer students graduating than ever before, all because students refuse to be standardized.

Themes: 
education
freedom
learning

More on Technology in the Classroom - NOT

reading on a desk top

A friend sent a link to a New York Times article about technology in the classroom – NOT.

The chief technology officer of eBay sends his children to a nine-classroom school here. So do employees of Silicon Valley giants like Google, Apple, Yahoo and Hewlett-Packard. But the school’s chief teaching tools are anything but high-tech: pens and paper, knitting needles and, occasionally, mud. Not a computer to be found. No screens at all. They are not allowed in the classroom, and the school even frowns on their use at home.

Themes: 
childhood
creativity
education
learning

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